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I have a set of API routes in rails as follows

namespace "api" do
   namespace "v1" do
     resources :users do
       resources :posts
       resources :likes
       ...
     end
   end
end

So far, so good. I can GET /api/v1/users/fred_flintstone and retrieve all of the information for that user.

What I would like to do now is add the concept of "me" (ala facebook) such that if the user is authenticated (fred_flintstone), I can also do the following

GET /api/v1/me

GET /api/v1/me/posts

...

I require both sets of routes. So I want to achieve the same results either using GET /api/v1/me/posts OR GET /api/v1/users/fred_flintstone/posts.

I've been through the route tutorial and have googled so a pointer would be as much appreciated as a direct answer.

EDIT:

What I've done that has worked is pretty hacky. I've created a second set of entries in the routes table using a scope:

scope "/api/v1/me", :defaults => {:format => 'json'}, :as => 'me' do
  resources :posts, :controller => 'api/v1/users/posts'
  resources :likes, :controller => 'api/v1/users/likes'
  ...
end

And then I added a set_user method that tests for the presence of params[:user_id]. I'm really looking for a way to DRY this up.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What about leaving the routes the way they are in your post, and just solving this inside the controller?

Heres a before_filter that you could apply to all of the routes you have which pull a User from a :user_id.

# Set the @user variable from the current url; 
# Either by looking up params[:user_id] or
# by assigning current_user if params[:user_id] = 'me'
def user_from_user_id
  if params[:user_id] == 'me' && current_user
    @user = current_user
  else
    @user = User.find_by_user_id params[:user_id]
  end

  raise ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound unless @user
end

Then in your controller functions you can just use the @user variable without having to worry about whether the user passed a user_id, or me.

Hope that helps! :)

EDIT:

Lemme take another shot, given your comments.

How about a function that lists all the resources you wish to access via both the standard routes and the /me route. Then you can just use the function in both the namespaces you require.

routes.rb

# Resources for users, and for "/me/resource"
def user_resources
  resources :posts
  resources :likes
  ...
end

namespace 'api' do
   namespace 'v1' do
     resources :users do
       user_resources
     end
   end
end

scope '/api/v1/:user_id', :constraints => { :user_id => 'me' },
                          :defaults => {:format => 'json'}, :as => 'me' do
  user_resources
end

# We're still missing the plain "/me" route, for getting
# and updating, so hand code those in
match '/api/v1/:id' => 'users#show', :via => :get,
                                     :constraints => { :id => 'me' }                
match '/api/v1/:id' => 'users#update', :via => :put,
                                       :constraints => { :id => 'me' }
share|improve this answer
    
For params[:user_id] to work the path would look like /api/v1/users/me instead of /api/v1/me which is what I was really hoping to do. Also I would have to propagate this to all the resource controllers within the users purview, i.e. users/posts users/likes etc whether via a module or inheritance. –  Kris Robison Apr 17 '12 at 18:39
    
Upvoted because I did have to do this part even in the hacked version of how I eventually got my api routes looking the way I wanted. –  Kris Robison Apr 17 '12 at 19:14
    
I took another swing, given your comments. I don't quite understand your comment "I would have to propagate this to all the resource controllers..". Are you referring to having to set before filters on all of the controllers which require this function? You could keep the function in your base controller, or include it in a helper and even just run it as a global before filter, assuming you don't have other routes where you need to handle :user_id differently. Anywho, hope some of that helps! ;) –  goggin13 Apr 18 '12 at 19:02
    
Thanks! I was wondering if you could group routes together like that. The inheritance structure of the API controllers is a bit convoluted in its inheritance pattern. That's why it's a bit messier than I'd like for setting the user. But referring to the same block of routes definitely cleans up routes.rb. –  Kris Robison Apr 24 '12 at 17:11

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