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I was wondering if is there a way to know if a function was called from other specific function.

doc(){
foo();
}

bar() {
doc();
}

foo() {
if (bar in the callStack ) { /* do this */}
}

Thanks!!

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Nope, there is no way to do that in standard C++. –  Seth Carnegie Apr 11 '12 at 23:20
    
Nope, not portably. –  ildjarn Apr 11 '12 at 23:20
2  
Classic XY Problem! What are you actually trying to do? –  Johnsyweb Apr 11 '12 at 23:21
2  
If you have designed your function such that it acts differently depending on what function called it then you have bigger problems. See: blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2006/03/23/558887.aspx –  Ed S. Apr 11 '12 at 23:23

5 Answers 5

You can't do that without using many platform-specific hacks. A debugger will give you that info, but in general, you can't access the stack without using ASM hackery in C++.

If you have to do that, you're doing something wrong with your design. What are you trying to do so we can help?

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1  
Shouldn't this be a comment rather than an answer? Basically you say you can do it, just not portably ... but don't give an example how it could be done on some particular platform (or pointers to that). –  0xC0000022L Apr 11 '12 at 23:28
1  
No, my answer is don't do it. Sometimes the right answer isn't necessarily the answer you're looking for. If he has to ask this, the ASM wizardry to pull this off will be way beyond him, anyway. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Apr 11 '12 at 23:32
    
OK, fair enough –  0xC0000022L Apr 11 '12 at 23:38

Not that it's a good idea or good design, but of course you could use another global flag, like:

doc(){
   foo();
}

int inBar = 0;

bar() {
   inBar = 1;
   doc();
   inBar = 0;
}

foo() {
if (inBar) { /* do this */}
}
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1  
Ya, and note that you should probably make inBar static, and also that this is neither thread nor instance-safe if the functions he's asking about are actually methods on a class. –  Kevin Anderson Apr 11 '12 at 23:43
1  
@Kevin: You should just not do this in the first place. –  Ed S. Apr 11 '12 at 23:45
    
@Ed S. - Oh hell no. I totally agree that this is awful, but I can also see that sometimes you are severely constrained by what you're working within and/or deadlines, and so "getting it out the door working" is more important than everything else. I hate doing it, but I have, and I'm sure every other developer on here has at one time or another as well. –  Kevin Anderson Apr 12 '12 at 1:01
    
@Kevin: I can understand that, I'm just having a really hard time seeing how this solution fits into that category. I mean, what sort of problem could this possibly solve that would require far too much time to solve in a better way? It seems to me that the OP thinks this is the best/fastest solution, but I think s/he is probably wrong. –  Ed S. Apr 12 '12 at 1:09
    
@Kevin: It's of course made thread-safe by making inBar thread-local, and instance-safe by making it an instance variable. But yes, it's quite hard to make it both. –  MSalters Apr 12 '12 at 10:49

You should use a library that suits your compiler.

For GCC, you can think of Backtraces. This one is based on GCC builtins c/c++: call stack v.2.

For Visual C I heard about StackWalk64, but never used it myself.

You can also, of course, make your own "traces", but I think it is not what you want.

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You can modify bar() to set a global bool to true on entry and false on exit. Testing the bool in foo() will tell you if you in the bar() call stack.

namespace {
   bool test_bar = false;

}

void bar( ) {
   test_bar = true;

   // do stuff


   test_bar = false;
}

If you need the above to work in a multi_threaded environment, then the global bool will have to be thread local (using something like boost::thread_specific_ptr) This sort of construct should only be used for tracing race conditions that are hard to catch in a debugger, it's a quick and dirty tool, other uses indicate a poor design.

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how to know if a function was called from an specific function c++

You can't do that. However, you can add boolean argument to the function

foo(bool calledFromBar = false) {
     if (calledFromBar) { /* do this */}
}

And set this flag from bar. However, this will cause another problem - nothing will stop any other function from setting the flag.

I think this (additional problem) can be fixed this way:

class BarFlag{
private:
    bool flag;
protected:
    friend void doc();
    BarFlag(bool flag_)
    :flag(flag_){
    }
public:
    inline operator bool() const{
        return flag;
    }
    BarFlag()
    :flag(false){
    }
}

void foo(BarFlag flag = BarFlag()){
     if (flag){/*do it*/}        
}

//somewhere else
void doc(){
   foo(BarFlag(true));
}
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