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These are taken from the tuts-premium Jquery vid tutorials.
http://tutsplus.com/lesson/the-this-keyword/ Jeff explains what 'this' is referring to each time but I'm not sure I've grasped the reasoning behind them all.

E.g. 1

function doSomething(e) { 
e.preventDefault(); 
console.log(this);
} 

$('a').on('click', doSomething);

In this case "this refers to the 'a' element" (being in this case the parent object)

I guess that's because here the statement equates to :

$('a').on('click', function (e) { 
    e.preventDefault(); 
    console.log(this);
    } 

So 'a' is the parent object

E.g. 2

var obj = { 
    doIt: function(e){ 
    e.preventDefault(); 
    console.log(this);
    }
}

$('a').on('click',  obj.doIt);

In this case "this still refers to the 'a' element " (*but apparently it's not the parent object?)

It seems this time we're calling a method but the statement still equates to the same thing as E.g. 1

*One thing in the tutorial has me a bit confused. I thought 'this' always refers to the parent object so in this case 'a' is still the parent object. But (at 05.23 in the tutorial ) he infers that's not the case, stating "there may be times when you want 'this' to refer to it's parent object which would be 'obj' " in which event he creates e.g.3.

E.g. 3

var obj = { 
    doIt: function(){ 
    console.log(this);
    }
}

$('a').on('click',  function(e){    
obj.doIt(); 
        };
e.preventDefault(); 

In this case "this refers to the obj object"

I presume this to with the fact that 'this' is in a nested function as this statement equates to :

$('a').on('click',  function(){    
function(){ console.log(this);}
};
e.preventDefault(); 

I don't really understand why though, particularly as I read in an article that in nested functions 'this' "loses its way and refers to the head object (window object)".

E.g.4

var obj = { 
    doIt: function(){ 
    console.log(this);     
    }
}

$('a').on('click',  function(e){    
       obj.doIt.call(this);             
       e.preventDefault(); 
});

In this case "This refers to the 'a'"

According to Javascript Definitive Guide "The first argument to both call() is the object on which the function is to be invoked" Here "this" is the used as the first argument. But "this" is not the object on which the function is to be invoked??
I think I get that the call function is there to invoke the function and use its first parameter as a pointer to a different object but I don't get why using 'this' means the function is invoked by 'a'. It's not something I've seen in other call() examples either.

Sorry for such a mammoth post. Hopefully someone's still reading by this stage…

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+1 because it's too late here for me to start responding to this excellent question. No doubt someone else will soon - it's a vital point and one that's generally covered poorly in JS tutorials. –  jimw Apr 12 '12 at 0:42
3  
"I thought 'this' always refers to the parent object..." No, don't think of this as the parent object. Think of it as a calling context whose value can be set in several different ways, one of which happens to be calling a method from an object. –  squint Apr 12 '12 at 0:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I hope this helps clarifying the issue, it can be confusing indeed.

  • When this is loose on your code, it will refer to the global object (in web browsers, that is window).

    console.log(this); // window
    
  • When this is inside an object method (like on your E.g. 3), it will refer to the object. This aplies to objects instanced with new, or as object literals (like on your example).

     var obj = { 
         doIt: function(e){ 
             console.log(this);
         }
     }
     obj.doIt(); // obj
    
  • Inside an event handler, this will refer to the object the event is bound to.

    // This is the plain js equivalent of your jQuery example
    document.getElementsByTagName['a'][0].addEventListener('click', function(e){
        console.log(this); // the first anchor on the document
    });
    
    // This is exactly the same:
    var clickHandler = function(e){
        console.log(this); // the first anchor on the document
    };
    document.getElementsByTagName['a'][0].addEventListener('click', clickHandler); 
    
    // Even if the handler is defined inside of another object, this will be
    // the obj the event is bound to. It's the case of your E.g. 2
    var obj = { 
        doIt: function(e){  
            console.log(this); // the first anchor on the document
        }
    }
    document.getElementsByTagName['a'][0].addEventListener('click', obj.doIt);
    // When you pass obj.doIt to addEventListener above, you are passing a reference
    // to that function. It's like "stealing" the function from the object
    
  • When an object is passed as the first parameter to Function.call or Function.apply, if this appears inside of the function it will refer to the object you passed. It's a way to force what this will be pointing to.

    var obj = { 
        doIt: function(){ 
            console.log(this); // window 
        }
    }
    obj.doIt.call(window);
    
share|improve this answer
    
However, given obj with a doIt function, if we do var fn = obj.doIt; fn(), this will refer to window inside of fn. –  Tikhon Jelvis Apr 12 '12 at 1:06
    
Yes, just like it was on my example with addEventListener (except that in that case it will be pointing to a DOM node, not window). But the logic is the same. –  bfavaretto Apr 12 '12 at 1:10

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/this is a short introduction into the this keyword. And have a look into the reference for call().

As jQuery calls (yes, with the .call() method) event handlers in the context of the dom element, all your examples are explained.

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The way this behaves in JavaScript is a little confusing at first. Basically, unlike variables (which are statically scoped), this is dynamically scoped. That is, the value of this is determined by where you call the function rather than where you wrote it.

When you pass your function to on, it later gets called from a context where this is the element in question. This happens regardless of how you got that function. That is to say, a function does not care whether you access it using syntax like obj.fn or just its name fn--the value of the expression is the same in either case.

With things other than functions, this makes sense. Given:

var a   = 10,
    obj = { a : 10 };

you'll agree that the expressions a and obj.a have the same value. This is also true of functions.

In short: the value of this depends on where and how you call the function rather than how and where you declared it or how you referred to it before calling it.

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3  
We shouldn't confuse this with "scope". They're entirely separate. And this isn't determined by where, but rather by how the function is called. –  squint Apr 12 '12 at 0:50
    
Taking a closer look, there are several things wrong. Like... "...it later gets called from a context where this is the element in question". This makes no difference. There's no transfer of the enclosing context to the invoked one unless you manually transfer it using .call() or .apply(). And this... "...a function does not care whether you access it using syntax like obj.fn or just its name fn" ...isn't right either. It very much makes a difference. –  squint Apr 12 '12 at 0:55
    
My point was that the expression f and obj.f have the same value (as long as f and obj.f point to the same function). Perhaps I was not sufficiently clear on that. As for the other point, you can change the value of this without call or apply by putting the function in the object. So whether you call it from an object or by itself matters, but for just accessing it (getting the function as a value) it does not matter. –  Tikhon Jelvis Apr 12 '12 at 0:58
    
Right, but that would mean it depends on how you refer to it, which contradicts your last sentence stating "this depends on where you call the function rather than ... how you refer to it." And yes, you can change this, without .call() or .apply(), but as I stated, you can't transfer the enclosing context to the invoked function without them unless this happens to be the same object. –  squint Apr 12 '12 at 1:02
    
Hmm, that last sentence does seem wrong. What I meant was that this depends on how and where you call the function but not how you referred to it earlier or how and where you declared it. I'll have to update it. –  Tikhon Jelvis Apr 12 '12 at 1:04

Really appreciate these responses guys. I posted in the early hrs and have tried (& needed)to take a bit of time to digest your feedback.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/this was a great shout. I've read quite few articles/tuts and this one seems like one of the better ones.

I think the main enlightenment has been that the object bound to 'this' is determined by how/where the function was called (calling context) rather than how or where the function was defined.

So just to return things to the Q&A scope and attempt to answer my own Q in light of what you guys have responded…

E.g. 1 Here: the 'doSomething' function was called in context of the click handler so the object bound to 'this' is "a"

E.g. 2 Again the click handler is still triggering the function so the object bound to 'this' is "a"

E.g. 3 In the nested function the calling context is obj.doIt(). So, as he says in tutorial, the object bound to 'this' is "obj".

Although, based on similar logic from developer.mozilla.org example below, isn't the object really bound to "obj.doIt":

o.b = {g: independent, prop: 42};  
console.log(o.b.g()); // logs 42  

"the this binding is only affected by the most immediate member reference…. this inside the function will refer to o.b. The fact that the object is itself a member of o has no consequence; the most immediate reference is all that matters."

E.g. 4

Here - 'call''s job is to indirectly invoke the function as if it's a method of a new object - in this case one we've defined as 'this'. Here 'this' refers to "a' as it's part of the function triggered by the click handler.

I hope this is a bit closer. I feel like a dunce on this (dire pun intended) because the answers are being presented to me yet I'm still not entirely confident I'm nailing the concept.

If I do have to crawl back to my hole for a while to digest I plead newby status, crash coursing Javascript&JQuery for just a few weeks now.

Thanks again for the feedback everybody.

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