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I have a method being called by another class that performs a number of steps on a collection of objects. Specifically, I'm copying a list of files from their original locations to a new folder. After the files have been copied, I update a database with additional data related to the group of files. It looks something like this:

public void copyFilesAndStore(File[] files, DataObject additionalData){
    for (File f in files){
        copyFileToDestination(f);
    }
    updateDatabase(additionalData);
}

The issue is, that the copyFileToDestination(File f) method can throw various IOExceptions if there's an issue with one of the files, but even if there is an exception on one of the files, I'd like to continue copying the rest of the files, and make the call to update the database. So I can do something like this:

public void copyFilesAndStore(File[] files, DataObject additionalData){
    for (File f in files){
        try {
            copyFileToDestination(f);
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            log(ex);
        }
    }
    updateDatabase(additionalData);
}

However, the class calling copyFilesAndStore() needs to know if the copy was successful or not, but if I catch all the exceptions inside this method, it won't know about them. Does it make sense at all to do something like below, or am I missing a better solution?

public void copyFilesAndStore(File[] files, DataObject additionalData){

    IOException encounteredException = null;

    for (File f in files){
        try {
            copyFileToDestination(f);
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            log(ex);
            encounteredException = ex;
        }
    }

    updateDatabase(additionalData);

    if (encounteredException != null)
        throw(encounteredException);
}
share|improve this question
3  
I think if you're saving the Exception objects, you should store a Collection of all of them, not just the last one. – bdares Apr 12 '12 at 1:16
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is perfectly safe to store an exception (excluding some corner cases, like OutOfMemoryException and the like), but if you want to store possible exceptions in a loop, it is usually a good idea to store them all:

public void copyFilesAndStore(File[] files, DataObject additionalData){ 

    List<IOException> encounteredExceptions = new LinkedList<IOException>(); 

    for (File f in files){ 
        try { 
            copyFileToDestination(f); 
        } catch (IOException ex) { 
            log(ex); 
            encounteredExceptions.add(ex); 
        } 
    } 

    updateDatabase(additionalData); 

    if (!encounteredExceptions.empty()) {
        throw(new DelayedException(encounteredExceptions)); 
    }
} 

where DelayedException is your own custom exception that can store a list of other exceptions (kind of like the caused-by chain in a regular exception)

share|improve this answer

I think it would be more appropriate to throw your own Exception, listing encounteredException as the cause:

throw new CopyAndStoreFailedException(encounteredException);

It might even make sense to have your exception type be able to keep track of multiple cause exceptions: it's possible that the consuming code will want to know which specific files failed to copy, so that it can indicate the problem to the user or try to recover from the problem in some way. So you pass your custom exception a whole list of encounteredExceptions, which can be retrieved via a getter method.

share|improve this answer

Don't re-throw them later, for sure- only the first will go, anyway. I'd personally just store the offending file name (and possibly a friendly, specific error string) to a list and display them later. Eg. "File abc.txt failed: Not found"

share|improve this answer

That is fine, but you are only throwing the last exception caught. You might want to store all the files that had errors then return the list.

public void copyFilesAndStore(File[] files, DataObject additionalData){

    YourExceptionClass encounteredException = new YourExceptionClass();

    for (File f in files){
        try {
            copyFileToDestination(f);
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            log(ex);
            encounteredException.addFile(f);
        }
    }

    updateDatabase(additionalData);

    if (encounteredException.hasFiles)
        throw(encounteredException);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I realized that only the last one would be thrown; I'll have to see what the requirements are for the calling class (being developed by another individual), and whether they are concerned with actually knowing what specific exceptions occurred, or only that at least one exception did occur. Thanks! – Sammy1Am Apr 12 '12 at 18:20

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