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I created a property for the NSArray which creates a getter/setter. I know Apple recommends using the instance variable in the init and dealloc method. I'm trying to figure what to do in the following code.

(1) Do I need an extra release statement? Wouldn't array have a retain count of 2 then 1 with the dealloc, leave a leak. Or would autorelease take care of this?

(2) Is there some way in xCode or instruments to follow a specific variable to see its retain count going through the process.

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSArray *array;

@synthesize arrary = _array;

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil 
               bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil 
        initWithArray:(NSArray *)array
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {

        _array = [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:array];

    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [_array release];

    [super dealloc];
}
share|improve this question
    
What's results in [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:results];? –  dasblinkenlight Apr 12 '12 at 1:47
    
Sorry, it should say array. Just a passed array from another class –  Vikings Apr 12 '12 at 1:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(1) Do I need an extra release statement? Wouldn't array have a retain count of 2 then 1 with the dealloc, leave a leak. Or would autorelease take care of this?

Let's step through this:

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSArray *array;

// The setter in this case will do the proper ref counting:
@synthesize arrary = _array;

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil 
               bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil 
        initWithArray:(NSArray *)array
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil];
    if (self) {
        // _array is nil at allocation
        _array = [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:array]; // << self holds one reference

    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [_array release];  // << self holds zero references
    [super dealloc];
}

In other words, you need nothing more. Personally, I would just use copy in the initializer and for the property (as opposed to retain).

(2) Is there some way in xCode or instruments to follow a specific variable to see its retain count going through the process.

Yes. There are several runtime shortcuts and exceptions to this, however.

The easiest way is to just run instruments with the allocation instrument, then enable reference count recording. It will then record the backtrace and time for every ref count of every individual object.

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Thanks, you mentioned copy, how would you use this in situations when you pass variables through init? –  Vikings Apr 13 '12 at 14:24
    
@Vikings with a property declared as @property (nonatomic, copy) NSArray *array; and the initializer _array = [array copy]; (although _array = [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:array]; accomplishes the same thing). –  justin Apr 13 '12 at 16:42
  1. Your code looks ok to me. You shouldn't have to put an extra release. In your init method, the retain count for _array is 1. After you release in dealloc, you should do _array = nil, to avoid dangling pointers.

  2. To check for leaks you can do either or both of the following:

(i) CMD + Shift + B ---> This runs analyze on your code to spot issues like this.

(ii) Use the "Leaks" and "Allocations" tools in "Instruments". Here you can watch the allocations and leaks (if any) that your application has while executing. It is very useful, and sometimes catches things that "Analyze" doesn't catch.

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Setting the _array = nil is unnecessary –  Vikings Apr 13 '12 at 3:15

Edit: Changed to conform to Apple's recommendations. The comments that follow this answer refer to my original (and very bad) version. In future, I will pay proper attention to Practical Memory Management in the iOS Developer Library.

Question (1): No, you don't need an extra release. After [[ASArray alloc] initWithArray:array], your array will have a retain count of 1. In dealloc, the call to [_array release] will return it to 0, and it should be freed.

If [setArray:] is called in the meantime, it will obey its property declaration of retain by retaining the new object and releasing the old one.

If some other object or method retains your array, it is their responsibility to release it. If your array's retainCount is greater than 1 at the start of dealloc, some other object is retaining it, at least temporarily.

Question (2): You can check retainCount at run time, but as the NSObject Protocol Reference warns, it's easy for your object to end up in multiple autorelease pools, making its count meaninglessly high.

Bonus: You may be thinking that [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:array] will use the retain count of its input and add 1. This only happens if the "copy" is made by retaining and passing a reference to an immutable source, in which case some other object is also retaining a reference to that source. [[NSString alloc] initWithString:] detects if its source is immutable and does this; [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:] does not. [NSArray copy], on the other hand, will retain and return itself.

These optimizations are of course implementation-specific and should never be assumed. However, it can be educational to construct some objects, avoiding autorelease, and follow their addresses and retainCounts, like this:

NSArray *array1 = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:@"a", nil];
// Do not just assign array1 to [[NSArray alloc] init], or you'll get a singleton empty array with a high retain count.
// Make array1 mutable, and array2 should be copied differently.
NSLog(@"Constructed array1");
NSLog(@"array1 address = %p retainCount = %d", array1, [array1 retainCount]);
NSArray *array2 = [array1 copy];
// Use [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:] and the results may be different.
NSLog(@"Constructed array2");
NSLog(@"array1 address = %p retainCount = %d", array1, [array1 retainCount]);
NSLog(@"array2 address = %p retainCount = %d", array2, [array2 retainCount]);
[array1 release];
NSLog(@"Released array1");
NSLog(@"array2 address = %p retainCount = %d", array2, [array2 retainCount]);
[array2 release];
share|improve this answer
    
But be careful...this code will result in overretaining -> self.array = [[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:array] –  borrrden Apr 12 '12 at 1:52
    
@borrrden if I autorelease after I alloc, that should take care of it right, or is there a more elegant way –  Vikings Apr 12 '12 at 1:54
    
@Vikings Yes, that is the way to do it if you use the property to assign it. Or you can do what you did and assign to the instance variable. If Apple recommends that you do that, then you should strongly consider following that recommendation anyway :). –  borrrden Apr 12 '12 at 1:58
    
@Vikings: In cases where you need to alloc something, yes, you'd use self.array = [[[NSArray alloc] initWithArray:array] autorelease]. However, NSArray helpfully provides the [NSArray arrayWithArray:] class method to achieve the same thing. I've edited my answer to copy your input array using this. –  Dondragmer Apr 12 '12 at 2:10
    
@Dondragmer Apple's Documentation warns against using the setter in dealloc. Instead they say you should release the instance variable, in this case _array –  Vikings Apr 13 '12 at 3:18

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