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Im getting the following error:

Cannot use local variable 'dob' before it is declared

Here is my implementation

public class Person
    {
        ...
        public string dob { get; set; }
        ...

       public int getAge()
       {
                DateTime origin = DateTime.Parse(dob);
                return DateTime.Today.Year - origin.Year;
        }

        public string getFormattedDoB()
        {
                DateTime origin = DateTime.Parse(dob);
                string dob = origin.ToString("d");
                return dob;
        }
    }

I am not sure what to make of this because it is complaining about it's use of dob in getFormattedDoB() but not in getAge() which comes before it. If anyone could shed some light on this that would be great

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1  
Can you explain why dob is not DateTime? You would need a pretty good reason to use string over a specific type. –  ChaosPandion Apr 12 '12 at 1:57
    
It's part of a merger program that retrieves information from a Unix based program, so it's easier to transport the time in seconds as a string and parse into the DateTime on the Windows end –  CStreel Apr 12 '12 at 1:59
    
OK but it seems rather pointless to parse the string every time. Why not simply do it once? –  ChaosPandion Apr 12 '12 at 2:04
    
This is the first iteration of the program, that was one of many future optimization i have planned –  CStreel Apr 12 '12 at 2:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You've declared a local variable in getFormattedDoB called dob. The compiler can't tell the difference between that and the member dob. Try adding "this" where you mean the member variable rather than the local:

DateTime origin = DateTime.Parse(this.dob);

Better still, don't use the same name for the local variable.

Edit: Unless you did actually intended to set the member variable and not create a new one. In which case remove the "string" as Andrew suggested.

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Thanks for that i didn't pick that up >< –  CStreel Apr 12 '12 at 1:51
3  
The error is not that the compiler cannot tell the difference; the compiler can tell the difference. Rather, the error is the error that is actually reported. A local variable is in scope throughout the block; it is an error to use it before the declaration. –  Eric Lippert Apr 12 '12 at 6:08

The problem is that you have two dobs- the property and the local variable. The scope of a variable declaration (string dob = ...) is the whole block (everything between the { and }). Therefore the compiler thinks that on the line:

DateTime origin = DateTime.Parse(dob);

you are using the dob variable before it is declared, when (we assume) you really meant the dob property.

As others have mentioned, you should rename the property. The standard naming convention in C# would be

public String DateOfBirth { get; set; } 
//(assuming that is what DOB stands for)

or better yet

public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; } 
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You have reused the variable name "dob" in getFormattedDoB as a local string, which is confusing the compiler. There are 2 possible solutions:

  1. Rename the local dob in getFormattedDoB (which you really should do because it's good practice).
  2. Use this.dob in the following line to specify the class level variable (which you should probably also do because it's also good practice:

    DateTime origin = DateTime.Parse(this.dob);

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You are redeclaring dob in

string dob = origin.ToString("d"); 

it should be

 dob = origin.ToString("d"); 
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