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As part of our application (in production for about 4 months now) we have a stream of data coming from an external device that we convert to an IObservable

Up until now we've been using the following to generate it, and it's been working quite well.

IObservable<string> ObserveStringStream(Stream inputStream)
{
    var streamReader = new StreamReader(inputStream);
    return Observable
            .Create<string>(observer => Scheduler.ThreadPool
            .Schedule(() => ReadLoop(streamReader, observer)));
}

private void ReadLoop(StreamReader reader, IObserver<string> observer)
{
    while (true)
    {
        try
        {
            var line = reader.ReadLine();
            if (line != null)
            {
                observer.OnNext(line);
            }
            else
            {
                observer.OnCompleted();
                break;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            observer.OnError(ex);
            break;
        }
    }
}

Last night I wondered if there was a way to use the yield return syntax to achieve the same result and came up with this:

IObservable<string> ObserveStringStream(Stream inputStream)
{
    var streamReader = new StreamReader(inputStream);
    return ReadLoop(streamReader)
            .ToObservable(Scheduler.ThreadPool);
}

private IEnumerable<string> ReadLoop(StreamReader reader)
{
    while (true)
    {
        var line = reader.ReadLine();
        if (line != null)
        {
            yield return line;
        }
        else
        {
            yield break;
        }
    }
}

It seems to work quite well and it's much cleaner, but I was wondering if there were any pros or cons for one way over the other, or if there was a better way entirely.

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2  
Pro: yield return supports lazy/late loading of your collection. –  M.Babcock Apr 12 '12 at 2:29
1  
Con: when an exception is thrown it does not call OnException, it just bubbles up –  Matthew Finlay Apr 12 '12 at 3:41
    
I guess it depends if you don't mind burning a thread to do your read loop, which goes down to how many devices you need to support. I wrote an AsyncTextReader that was itself Observable<string> to do something similar, but at scale. Surely these days you could AWAIT something... –  piers7 Apr 12 '12 at 5:08
    
@MatthewFinlay Actually the OnException seems to work, if I subscribe and include actions for OnNext, OnError and OnCompleted I get all 3 called as expected –  baralong Apr 12 '12 at 5:37
    
@piers7 that's an excellent point. In the old version I only had one device to talk to, but in a future change I could have up to 40. I might persist for now, but keep an eye on it for performance issues. Another reason to brush up on the AWAIT syntax. –  baralong Apr 12 '12 at 5:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think you've got a good idea there (turn Stream into Enumerable then IObservable). However, the Enumberable code can be much cleaner:

IEnumerable<string> ReadLines(Stream stream)
{
    using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(stream))
    {
        while (!reader.EndOfStream)
            yield return reader.ReadLine();
    }
}

And then the Observable:

IObservable<string> ObserveLines(Stream inputStream)
{
    return ReadLines(inputStream).ToObservable(Scheduler.ThreadPool);
}

This is shorter, more readable, and properly disposes of the streams. It's also lazy.

The ToObservable extension takes care of catching the OnNext events (new lines) as well as the OnCompleted event (end of enumerable) and OnError.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, very clean. I'll have to give it a try tomorrow. My only concern is that I may get a trailing null as the last item in the Observable, but that's easy to filter out with .Where(line => line != null) –  baralong Apr 12 '12 at 9:30
    
@baralong: Did this end up working as expected? If this was helpful please accept the answer. –  yamen Apr 12 '12 at 23:53

I don't have the code to hand, but here's how to do it async pre-async CTP.

[Note for skim-readers: no need to bother if you don't need to scale much]

Create an AsyncTextReader implementation, that is itself Observable. The ctor takes in a Stream, and performs a BeginRead(256bytes) on the stream, passing itself as the continuation, then returning.

When the continuation is entered, call EndRead, and add the returned bytes into a little buffer on the class. Repeat this till the buffer contains one or more end-of-line sequences (as per TextWriter). When this happens, send those bit(s) of the buffer out as a string via the via the Observable interface, and repeat.

When you've finished, signal OnComplete etc... (and dispose the stream). If you get an exception thrown from the EndReadByte in your continuation, catch it and pass it out the OnError interface.

calling code then looks like:

IObservable = new AsyncTextReader(stream);

This scales well. Just need to make sure you don't do anything too dumb with the buffer handling.

pseudo code:

public ctor(Stream stream){
    this._stream = stream;
    BeginRead();
    return;
}

private void BeginRead(){
    // kick of async read and return (synchronously)
    this._stream.BeginRead(_buffer,0,256,EndRead,this);
}

private void EndRead(IAsyncResult result){
    try{
        // bytesRead will be *up to* 256
        var bytesRead = this._stream.EndRead(result);
        if(bytesRead < 1){
            OnCompleted();
            return;
        }
        // do work with _buffer, _listOfBuffers
        // to get lines out etc...
        OnNext(aLineIFound); // times n
        BeginRead(); // go round again
    }catch(Exception err){
        OnException(err);
    }
}

Ok, this is the APM, and something only a mother could love. I keenly Await the alternative.

ps: whether the reader should close the stream is an interesting question. I say no, because it didn't create it.

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