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I have a string that I read in like:

a+c+c+b+v+f+d+d+d+c

I need to write the program so it splits at the + then deletes the duplicates so the output is:

acbvfdc

I've tried tr///cs; but I guess I'm not using it right?

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3 Answers 3

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

my @strings = qw(
    a+c+c+b+v+f+d+d+d+c
    alpha+bravo+bravo+bravo+charlie+delta+delta+delta+echo+delta
    foo+food
    bark+ark
);

for my $s (@strings) {
    # Thanks @ikegami
    $s =~ s/ (?<![^+]) ([^+]+) \K (?: [+] \1 )+ (?![^+]) //gx;
    print "$s\n";
}

Output:

a+c+b+v+f+d+c
alpha+bravo+charlie+delta+echo+delta
foo+food
bark+ark

Now, you can split the string and have no sequences of duplicates using split /[+]/, $s because the first argument of split is a pattern.

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I put this into my code (which I can't figure out how to post here) and it deleted the duplicates but now when I try to split at the "+" it tells me that "Quantifier follows nothing in the regex" and stops the program from running. –  user1328009 Apr 12 '12 at 3:25
    
+ is special in a regex pattern. You either have to escape it, or put it in a character class (as I did in my s/// above). –  Sinan Ünür Apr 12 '12 at 3:52
    
Okay, thank you! I got it to work –  user1328009 Apr 12 '12 at 4:04
1  
That will fail for foo+food and for bark+ark. –  ikegami Apr 12 '12 at 4:07
1  
Quick fix: s/ (?<![^+]) ([^+]+) \K (?: [+] \1 )+ (?![^+]) //gx; Also got rid of $1 in replacement expression by using \K. –  ikegami Apr 12 '12 at 4:14

Note to any who reads: this does not address the OP's question directly, though in my defense the question was worded ambiguously. :-) Still, it answers an interpretation of the question that others might have, so I'll leave it as-is.

Does order matter? If not, you can always try something like this:

use strict;
use warnings;
my $string = 'a+c+c+b+v+f+d+d+d+c';

# Extract unique 'words'
my @words = keys %{{map {$_ => 1} split /\+/, $string}};

print "$_\n" for @words;

Better yet, use List::MoreUtils from CPAN (which does preserve the order):

use strict;
use warnings;
use List::MoreUtils 'uniq';

my $string = 'a+c+c+b+v+f+d+d+d+c';

# Extract unique 'words'
my @words = uniq split /\+/, $string;

print "$_\n" for @words;
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This splits it but I need it to only delete the duplicates when they come one after the other. –  user1328009 Apr 12 '12 at 3:19
    
Ah, I wasn't quite sure based on your original question. Thanks. –  David Mertens Apr 12 '12 at 3:31
my $s="a+c+c+b+v+f+d+d+d+c";
$s =~ tr/+//d;
$s =~ tr/\0-\xff/\0-\xff/s;
print "$s\n"; # => acbvfdc
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That does work in this special case, but it is not generalizable to the case where the elements are anything other than individual characters and/or the elements contain anything outsize of the a-z range. –  Sinan Ünür Apr 12 '12 at 3:55
    
@SinanÜnür Well, the OP certainly implied that the case in question was individual characters, and that he would be interested in a tr// solution. One can generalize to ascii instead of a-z with $s=~tr/\0-\xff/\0-\xff/s;. –  dbenhur Apr 12 '12 at 4:04

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