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I am having trouble with this following call, specially the last component:

Console.WriteLine("Taxpayer # {0} SSN: {1}, Income is {2:c}, Tax is {3:c}", i + 1, taxArray[i].SSN, taxArray[i].grossIncome, taxRates.CalculateTax(taxArray[i].grossIncome));

I am making a call to the CalculateTax method in the Rates class initiated as taxRates in main.

Here is the CalculateTax method

public int CalculateTax(int income)
    {

        int taxOwed;
        //  If income is less than the limit then return the tax as income times low rate.
        if (income < incLimit){
            taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * lowTaxRate); }
        //  If income is greater than or equal to the limit then return the tax as income times high rate.
        else if(income >= incLimit) {
            taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * highTaxRate);}
        else taxOwed = 0;
        return taxOwed;
    }

incLimit, lowTaxRate and highTaxRate are set previously

Any ideas why this is always coming out to 0. I even sent the method a number like 50000 and still got back 0.

I can get a value just using the method by itself so it is something else, here is the code

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Assignment5_2
{
public class Rates
{
    // Create a class named rates that has the following data members: 
    int incLimit;
    double lowTaxRate;
    double highTaxRate;

    // use read-only accessor
    public int IncomeLimit
    { get { return incLimit; } }
    public double LowTaxRate
    { get { return lowTaxRate; } }
    public double HighTaxRate
    { get { return highTaxRate; } }

    //A class constructor that assigns default values 
    public void assignRates()
    {
        //int limit = 30000;
        //double lowRate = .15;
        //double highRate = .28;
        incLimit = 30000;
        lowTaxRate = .15;
        highTaxRate = .28;
    }
    //A class constructor that takes three parameters to assign input values for limit, low rate and high rate.
    public void assignRates(int lim, double low, double high)
    {
        incLimit = lim;
        lowTaxRate = low;
        highTaxRate = high;
    }
    //  A CalculateTax method that takes an income parameter and computes the tax as follows:
    public int CalculateTax(int income)
    {

        int taxOwed;
        //  If income is less than the limit then return the tax as income times low rate.
        if (income < incLimit)
            taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * lowTaxRate); 
        //  If income is greater than or equal to the limit then return the tax as income times high rate.
        else 
            taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * highTaxRate);
        Console.WriteLine(taxOwed);
        return taxOwed;
    }


}  //end class Rates

// Create a class named Taxpayer that has the following data members:
public class Taxpayer : IComparable
{
    //Use get and set accessors.
    string SSN
    { set; get; }
    int grossIncome
    { set; get; }
    int taxOwed
    { set; get; }

    int IComparable.CompareTo(Object o)
    {
        int returnVal;
        Taxpayer temp = (Taxpayer)o;
        if (this.taxOwed > temp.taxOwed)
            returnVal = 1;
        else if (this.taxOwed < temp.taxOwed)
            returnVal = -1;
        else returnVal = 0;

        return returnVal;

    }  // End IComparable.CompareTo

    public static void GetRates()
    {
        //  Local method data members for income limit, low rate and high rate.
        int incLimit;
        double lowRate;
        double highRate;
        string userInput;
        Rates rates = new Rates();
        //  Prompt the user to enter a selection for either default settings or user input of settings.
        Console.Write("Would you like the default values (D) or would you like to enter the values (E)?:  ");
        /*   If the user selects default the default values you will instantiate a rates object using the default constructor
        * and set the Taxpayer class data member for tax equal to the value returned from calling the rates object CalculateTax method.*/
        userInput = (Console.ReadLine());
        if (userInput == "D" || userInput == "d")
        {

            rates.assignRates();
        } // end if
        /*  If the user selects to enter the rates data then prompt the user to enter values for income limit, low rate and high rate, 
         * instantiate a rates object using the three-argument constructor passing those three entries as the constructor arguments and 
         * set the Taxpayer class data member for tax equal to the valuereturned from calling the rates object CalculateTax method. */
        else if (userInput == "E" || userInput == "e")
        {
            Console.Write("Please enter the income limit: ");
            incLimit = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            Console.Write("Please enter the low rate: ");
            lowRate = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine());
            Console.Write("Please enter the high rate: ");
            highRate = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine());
            //Rates rates = new Rates();
            rates.assignRates(incLimit, lowRate, highRate);
        }
        else Console.WriteLine("You made an incorrect choice");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Taxpayer[] taxArray = new Taxpayer[5];
        Rates taxRates = new Rates();
        //  Implement a for-loop that will prompt the user to enter the Social Security Number and gross income.
        for (int x = 0; x < taxArray.Length; ++x)
        {
            taxArray[x] = new Taxpayer();
            Console.Write("Please enter the Social Security Number for taxpayer {0}:  ", x + 1);
            taxArray[x].SSN = Console.ReadLine();

            Console.Write("Please enter the gross income for taxpayer {0}:  ", x + 1);
            taxArray[x].grossIncome = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

        }

        Taxpayer.GetRates();

        //  Implement a for-loop that will display each object as formatted taxpayer SSN, income and calculated tax.
        for (int i = 0; i < taxArray.Length; ++i)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Taxpayer # {0} SSN: {1}, Income is {2:c}, Tax is {3:c}", i + 1, taxArray[i].SSN, taxArray[i].grossIncome, taxRates.CalculateTax(50000));//taxRates.CalculateTax(taxArray[i].grossIncome));

        } // end for 
        //  Implement a for-loop that will sort the five objects in order by the amount of tax owed 
        Array.Sort(taxArray);
        Console.WriteLine("Sorted by tax owed");
        for (int i = 0; i < taxArray.Length; ++i)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Taxpayer # {0} SSN: {1}, Income is {2:c}, Tax is {3:c}", i + 1, taxArray[i].SSN, taxArray[i].grossIncome, taxRates.CalculateTax(taxArray[i].grossIncome));

        }
    }  //end main

} //  end Taxpayer class

}  //end 
share|improve this question
7  
Having incLimit, lowTaxRate, and highTaxRate outside the scope of your method is very bad design. Your method should receive everything it needs without relying on global variables. –  Yuck Apr 12 '12 at 2:44
    
Although that's a rather unfair way of doing it, I do wish the U.S. Tax Code were that simple! –  jason Apr 12 '12 at 2:54
    
@Jason It's probably a training exercise, based on the simplicity of it. –  Yuck Apr 12 '12 at 2:55
1  
@Jason: stackoverflow.com/questions/693372/… -- Simply put, money should always be decimal. –  m-y Apr 12 '12 at 2:59
1  
@Jason: There's a big difference between what you could possibly do (pretty much anything) and what you should do. Hell, the OP could have opted to store the dollars into one int and the change into another int and created his own class to handle all the mathematics... but, it's always good to let people know that the accepted type for money is decimal. –  m-y Apr 12 '12 at 3:05

5 Answers 5

No-repro. Using the simple program below, I get valid non-zero result (900 using my values):

internal class Program {
    private static int incLimit = 30000;
    private static float lowTaxRate = 0.18F;
    private static float highTaxRate = 0.30F;

    private static void Main(string[] args) {
        var result = CalculateTax(5000);
    }

    public static int CalculateTax(int income) {
        int taxOwed;
        // If income is less than the limit then return the tax
        //   as income times low rate.
        if (income < incLimit) {
            taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * lowTaxRate);
        }
        // If income is greater than or equal to the limit then
        //   return the tax as income times high rate.
        else if (income >= incLimit) {
            taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * highTaxRate);
        }
        else taxOwed = 0;

        return taxOwed;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I get a similar non-zero result to yours with my own sample program. –  ravuya Apr 12 '12 at 2:51

Your problem is in your usage of the Rates.assignRates() method. You are only calling it from the static Taxpayer.GetRates() method. This method is acting on a local Rates object, and then then throwing the populated object away. You probably want to change Taxpayer.GetRates() to return a Rates object, returning the internally created (and populated) rates variable:

public static Rates GetRates() { ... return rates; }

And then in Main(), remove the existing call to Taxpayer.GetRates() and change the line where you declare the taxRates variable as follows:

Rates taxRates = Taxpayer.GetRates();

Also note that you should also be handling error cases due to bad/missing input somehow, but you don't seem to be doing that right now, so I didn't include any functional changes other than to get you back the populated Rates object.

Additionally, you might want to consider making the Rates class static, as you appear to only be using a single instance of it throughout.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 with him updating to show all his code, yep, that's the problem. –  Matt Apr 12 '12 at 19:19

Your last decision point else taxOwed = 0; will never execute, so it's not needed. I've ran your code as shown below and everything works. The problem must be with either the parameter being passed into the method being zero, or you are not setting the values like you think you are.

void Main()
{
    var result = CalculateTax(40000);
    Console.WriteLine(result);
}

public int CalculateTax(int income)
{
    var incLimit = 50000;
    var lowTaxRate = 0.10;
    var highTaxRate = 0.25;
    int taxOwed;

    if (income < incLimit){
        taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * lowTaxRate); }
    else if(income >= incLimit) {
        taxOwed = Convert.ToInt32(income * highTaxRate);}
    return taxOwed;
}

Update

Now that you posted your full code, your problem is that you need to change the static GetRates() method to return the rates, as Clark mentions. That static method is the only place calling rates.assignRates() and those assigned rates are only good for that specific instance of rates contained in that method and nowhere else. So change GetRates() to to return the rates instance as follows:

 public static Rates GetRates()
 {
    ...
    Rates rates = new Rates();
    ...
    return rates;
 } 

Then change the main method as follows:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Taxpayer[] taxArray = new Taxpayer[5];
    // Implement a for-loop that will prompt the user to enter
    // the Social Security Number and gross income.

    ...

    Rates taxRates = Taxpayer.GetRates();

    // Implement a for-loop that will display each object as formatted 
    // taxpayer SSN, income and calculated tax.
    for (int i = 0; i < taxArray.Length; ++i)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(
            "Taxpayer # {0} SSN: {1}, Income is {2:c}, Tax is {3:c}",
            i + 1, 
            taxArray[i].SSN, 
            taxArray[i].grossIncome,
            taxRates.CalculateTax(50000));

    } 
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

I would add debug statements in your method to confirm that lowTaxRate and hightTaxRate are not zero/null.

share|improve this answer

You sure lowTaxRate and highTaxRate are not set to 0 because anything multiplied by 0 is 0. Put some debuggers/MessageBoxes to check that.

share|improve this answer
    
I would make sure they're not zero with some debug statements. –  jahroy Apr 12 '12 at 2:47
6  
Please use real words. 'U' and 'coz' are not, and you're not chatting with your friends. These answers are used by adults who write software for a living, and others who actually want to be able to understand what they're reading. You surely can afford the effort to type 'You' instead of 'U', and the real word 'because' instead of 'coz' when talking to grownups. Thanks. :) –  Ken White Apr 12 '12 at 2:51
    
@Ken White: Point Accepted and corrected as well. Thanks –  Nikhil Agrawal Apr 12 '12 at 2:53

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