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I am in need of a failover environment where two servers are synchronized in real-time. I am working with two mini macs, and I have identified heartbeat and pacemaker as popular tools for monitoring if the failover environment needs to be brought up, yet I have not found anything on how to do the real-time backup. By real-time, I mean that if an end user on Server A (the live server) updates his/her profile info, then Server B (failover) automatically gets that change because the MySQL database that stores that information( on Server A) gets transferred "on update" so-to-speak to Server B (which should always perfectly mirror Server A). Likewise, if I change a web resource for the PHP GUI (an actual template file), that change would also be automatically transferred to Server B. The hope is to send all info from A to B without having to schedule a system backup to run each hour. Instead the process would be a little more "event-driven." Any information will help. I am also not opposed to changing the failover tools mentioned above. I had been considering virtualization but felt it was overkill since the hardware I have to work with are two mac minis and not a mega-server.

Thanks in advance for pointers.

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Ok, so I found the answer maybe to my own question. From what I am reading, it seems that heartbeat and pacemaker are used for monitoring when an active server goes down. They then bring the passive server up. I had originally thought that DRBD by Linbit was a solution, yet it is not supported on mac osx. I eventually decided to handle replication at the database level. MySQL Workbench is the editor I used for configuring the setup. I used AASync for the PHP files, but I just have them on a scheduled nightly backup.

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