Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In order to fix an IE9 bug I had to put the 'DOCTYPE' declaration at the top of the page:

 <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
 <?php
     require_once 'navBar.php';
 ?>

By putting the DOCTYPE at the top of the file, I fixed an IE9 'bug.'

The 'bug' in IE9 was -- without the DOCTYPE at the file's top -- any div that had inline-block style would ignore the inline-block style and would be stacked vertically.

I have 3 divs on the page with inline-block style and in Firefox and the Android browser the 3 divs with inline-block appear on one row, horizontally left-to-right.

But in IE9, I had to add the DOCTYPE as the 1st line (not the 2nd line, not after the php section at the top -- DOCTYPE had to be the 1st line).

THEN and only then will IE9 honor the inline-block style.

THE PROBLEM IS -- inside navbar.php I call session_start().

As you know, session_start() ALSO has to be the 1st line before any browser output is sent. You otherwise get an errmsg. like this:

  Warning: session_start() [function.session-start]: Cannot send 
  session cache limiter - headers already sent (output started at 
  /homepages/42/d329883313/htdocs/ourSite/landing_page.php:2) in 
  /homepages/42/d329883313/htdocs/ourSite/navBar.php on line 1

(p.s. my IDE saves files as UTF-8 so the BOM is NOT the issue. And I've already checked -- I don't have extra whitespace anywhere between the end of the DOCTYPE and the start of the session_start() either. The session_start() is breaking because of the DOCTYPE sending something to the browser.)

MY QUESTION:

How can I keep my inline-block AND the DOCTYPE and session_start()?

It's bad that the functioning of a simple UI style is pitting two 'MUST-BE-ON-LINE-1' code elements against each other (DOCTYPE and session_start).

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried putting <?php session_start(); ?> at the top of the page with no extra spaces? PHP is server side and HTML is client side, so the PHP should be gone before IE9 interprets the page. –  Cassie Carter Apr 12 '12 at 3:34
    
If the <?php occurs before the DOCTYPE then IE9 will ignore the inline-block in the divs I have on the page. DOCTYPE must be on the top line of the file. I understand your reasoning. But when I put DOCTYPE below the closing ?> with no white space at all then IE9 will ignore my inline-block style. Not sure why. Maybe the web server puts something at the top of the page after processing the PHP, I don't know. –  wantTheBest Apr 12 '12 at 3:41
    
fair enough, but when you say you tried putting it straight after, do you mean after the require_once or after session_start (on its own)? –  Cassie Carter Apr 12 '12 at 3:46
    
Either require_once or session_start have one thing in common: they come before the closing ?> of the PHP block. I'm saying that it doesn't matter WHAT is in the PHP block -- if the DOCTYPE comes after the ?> close of the PHP block, then the inline-block for the divs is ignored in IE9. I'm finding that DOCTYPE has to be BEFORE the opening <?php on the very first line or inline-block for divs is ignored in IE9. –  wantTheBest Apr 12 '12 at 3:55
    
Yeh, I totally get what you're saying. I'm just wondering if there is something in the navbar.php file thats causing the issue. Thats why I was asking if you had tried session_start by itself, rather than including the navbar file :) –  Cassie Carter Apr 12 '12 at 3:57
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

Solution was to switch from require_once 'somefile.php';

to

require_once('somefile.php');

Although Firefox and the Android browser were fine with the first style, IE9 had a quirk: it would ignore the inline-block style for divs.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.