Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I always see replace in the Array and Hash documentation and I always think that it's odd.

I'm sure I've done something like this many times:

a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]

...

if some_condition
    a = [:e, :f]
end

But I never thought to use this instead:

a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]

...

if some_condition
    a.replace [:e, :f]
end

Which I assume is the intended use. Does this really save memory, or have some other benefit, or is it just a style thing?

share|improve this question
    
I wonder how often this is used in the wild, e.g. in Rails. –  Andrew Grimm Apr 12 '12 at 6:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think the intended use is to modify an array in-place that has been passed to a method. For example:

def m(a)
    a.replace(%w[a b])
end

a = %w[x y z]
m(a)
# a is now ['a', 'b']

Without replace, you'd have to do something like this:

def m(a)
    a.clear
    a << 'a' # or use .push of course
    a << 'b'
end

Using replace lets you do it all at once should bypass the auto-shrinking and auto-growing (which probably involves copying some memory) behavior that would be a side effect of replacing the array's content (not the array itself!) element by element. The performance benefit (if any) is probably just an extra, the primary intent is probably to get pointer-to-pointer behavior without having to introduce pointers or wrap the array in an extra object.

share|improve this answer

a = [:e, :f] and a.replace [:e, :f],

the two statements generated instructions as follows:

1.

a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]
a = [:e, :f]

instructions:

ruby --dump=insns test.rb

== disasm: <RubyVM::InstructionSequence:<main>@test.rb>=================
local table (size: 2, argc: 0 [opts: 0, rest: -1, post: 0, block: -1] s1)
[ 2] a
0000 trace            1                                               (   1)
0002 duparray         [:a, :b, :c, :d]
0004 setdynamic       a, 0
0007 trace            1                                               (   2)
0009 duparray         [:e, :f]
0011 dup
0012 setdynamic       a, 0
0015 leave

2.

a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]
a.replace([:e, :f])

instructions:

ruby --dump=insns test.rb

== disasm: <RubyVM::InstructionSequence:<main>@test.rb>=================
local table (size: 2, argc: 0 [opts: 0, rest: -1, post: 0, block: -1] s1)
[ 2] a
0000 trace            1                                               (   1)
0002 duparray         [:a, :b, :c, :d]
0004 setdynamic       a, 0
0007 trace            1                                               (   2)
0009 getdynamic       a, 0
0012 duparray         [:e, :f]
0014 send             :replace, 1, nil, 0, <ic:0>
0020 leave

The replace method is not faster than assignment operator, but replace can modify receiver array in-place, and, replace method really save memory, this can be seen from rb_ary_replace's source.

VALUE
rb_ary_replace(VALUE copy, VALUE orig)
{
rb_ary_modify_check(copy);
orig = to_ary(orig);
if (copy == orig) return copy;

if (RARRAY_LEN(orig) <= RARRAY_EMBED_LEN_MAX)
{
    VALUE *ptr;
    VALUE shared = 0;

    if (ARY_OWNS_HEAP_P(copy))
    {
        xfree(RARRAY_PTR(copy));
    }
    else if (ARY_SHARED_P(copy))
    {
        shared = ARY_SHARED(copy);
        FL_UNSET_SHARED(copy);
    }
    FL_SET_EMBED(copy);
    ptr = RARRAY_PTR(orig);
    MEMCPY(RARRAY_PTR(copy), ptr, VALUE, RARRAY_LEN(orig));
    if (shared)
    {
        rb_ary_decrement_share(shared);
    }
    ARY_SET_LEN(copy, RARRAY_LEN(orig));
}
else
{
    VALUE shared = ary_make_shared(orig);
    if (ARY_OWNS_HEAP_P(copy))
    {
        xfree(RARRAY_PTR(copy));
    }
    else
    {
        rb_ary_unshare_safe(copy);
    }
    FL_UNSET_EMBED(copy);
    ARY_SET_PTR(copy, RARRAY_PTR(orig));
    ARY_SET_LEN(copy, RARRAY_LEN(orig));
    rb_ary_set_shared(copy, shared);
}
return copy; }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for teaching me about ruby --dump=insns –  Matt Huggins Apr 12 '12 at 13:48
a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]
b = [:x, :y, :z]
a.replace(b)

a.object_id == b.object_id
=> false

a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]
b = [:x, :y, :z]
a = b

a.object_id == b.object_id
=> true

Also

a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]
c = a
b = [:x, :y, :z]
a.replace(b)
p c # => [:x, :y, :z]

vs

a = [:a, :b, :c, :d]
c = a
b = [:x, :y, :z]
a = b
p c # => [:a, :b, :c, :d]

This does not answer your question exactly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.