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resharper offers me to make this a local variable, and writes "access to modified closure"

if (filter != null)
{
    if (filter.CityId != 0)
    {
        ads = ads.Where(x => x.Ad.CityId == filter.CityId);
    }
    if (filter.BusinesCategoryId != 0)
    {
        ads = ads.Where(x => x.BusinessCategoryId == filter.BusinesCategoryId);
    }
}

Why do local variable filter?

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2  
Which local variable , ads? –  Tigran Apr 12 '12 at 5:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because your query(Where(...)) is not being executed. I assume filter is obtained from a loop?

Linq query are not executed until they are used. so if you looped though a bunch of filters then started executing them later, the filter value would be wrong in the query.

A similar question : Access to Modified Closure Also: http://devnet.jetbrains.net/thread/273042

would need to see more code to 100% sure.

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it is dangerous when there is a cycle? I do not cycle. –  Mediator Apr 12 '12 at 6:38
2  
Closures can be modified without a loop. The loop is the most common cause of unintentionally modified closure variables, but it's not the only cause. –  phoog Apr 12 '12 at 6:43

From how I understand this, Resharper will throw an error if you access a variable from a delegate (closure), and then modify the variable before you execute the delegate. This mostly happens if you access a for loop variable inside a delegate/lambda and execute it outside the loop. If your code is like:

foreach (filter in filters)
{
      if (filter != null)  {
            if (filter.CityId != 0)      {
                ads = ads.Where(x => x.Ad.CityId == filter.CityId);
            }
            if (filter.BusinesCategoryId != 0)      {
                ads = ads.Where(x => x.BusinessCategoryId == filter.BusinesCategoryId);
            }
      }
} 
return ads.ToList()

Then it will not behave like you'd expect it to. But if you execute the lambda expressions inside the loop scope then you would have no problem.

I wont explain why it behaves that way because a lot of people already explained it very well:

UPDATE: To answer "Why do local variable?" is because the fix to the above problem is using a local variable (i.e., inside the loop) and using that in your lambda. That way you are closing over the different instances of the variable for each instance of the lambda.

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