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The string s includes space, tab, CR and LF. alert() can render format correctly, but $("#mydiv").text(s)lost CR and LF, I hope $("#mydiv").text(s) can render format correctly, how can I do this?

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
    <script src="Js/jquery-1.7.1.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(function () {
            $("#Button1").bind("click", function () {
                alert(s);
                $("#mydiv").text(s);
            });
        });
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <p>
        <input id="Button1" type="button" value="button" /></p>
    <div id="mydiv">
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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It may make more sense to use the <button> element instead of <input>. –  Andrew Marshall Apr 12 '12 at 7:23
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2 Answers

You can give the #mydiv a bit of CSS style for this:

#mydiv { white-space: pre; }

The problem is, that the jQuery .text() method just sets the HTML text, and HTML elements join all consecutive white space characters to a single space and also strip the first and last, if they're block elements (with <pre> the notable exception). This CSS declaration tells the div to act like a <pre> in this situation.

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1  
Perhaps "all consecutive whitespace is treated as a single space" is better than "don't respect white space". –  Andrew Marshall Apr 12 '12 at 7:19
    
@AndrewMarshall yep, thanks. Corrected it. –  Boldewyn Apr 12 '12 at 7:21
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Try to use .html(s) instead of .text(s)

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2  
That won't change anything. –  Andrew Marshall Apr 12 '12 at 8:08
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