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Suppose I have this tree :

           O-ROOT
         /        \
    O-A            O-B
     /          /       \
O-A1        O-B1        O-B2

and I want to do this in C#:

1. Check every node starting from root (I think the best way is trought recursion?);
2. If I found a node with value = "Hello", return true and STOP the searching function;

Can you help me to make the best algorithm for doing it?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're right with the recursion, see depth-first or breadth-first search algorithm. It is much easier for trees since you don't have keep list of already visited nodes.

public bool Search(TreeNode node, string searchString)
{
   if(node.Value == searchString) return true;
   foreach(var childNode in node.Children)
     if(Search(childNode, searchString)) return true;
   return false;
}
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bool FindHello(Node node)
{
    if (node.Content == "Hello")
        return true;
    foreach (Node c in node.Children)
        if (FindHello(c))
            return true;
    return false;
}
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I think the best approach for your problem will be to use breadth first search. It is simple to write and as effective as you can get.

EDIT: something like this:

public bool Search(TreeNode node, string searchString)
{
   Queue<Control> q = new Queue<Node>();
   q.Enqueue(node);
   while(!q.empty()) {
     Node current = q.Dequeue();
     foreach(var childNode in node.Children)
       if(childNode.Content.CompareTo(searchString) == 0) {
         return true;
       }
       q.Enqueue(childNode);
     }
   }
   return false;
}
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1  
For searching in trees depth-first is better - no additional collections, recursion only (and recursion is the DFS way;) –  Karel Frajtak Apr 12 '12 at 7:22
2  
My experience teaches me otherwise. The problem with dfs is that for high trees it will cause stack overflow. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 12 '12 at 7:23
    
I think so, too. You should only use recursion if you can be sure that the recursion depth is somewhat known and low enough - as well as not going to change. –  Christian Apr 12 '12 at 7:27
    
@izomorphius : can you give to me an example with code (C#)? –  markzzz Apr 12 '12 at 7:29
    
Why do you think BFS ist better? DFS can also be implemented without recursion and typically uses much less memory. –  Henrik Apr 12 '12 at 7:34

Breadth First Search and Depth First Search are amongst the most popular (amongst others) tree searching techniques, so you can started from there. Also, if each node in your tree will have at most 2 nodes and they are sorted in some way, you could use Binary Search Tree Techniques.

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  1. Indeed, definitely use recursion for this.
  2. If you are using a recursive method you can set a (static) member variable like result and check each iteration if it's set. If set, just jump out of the method (return) to stop the recursion running further.
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I would strongly suggest to NOT use recursion! You do not know, how deep the tree is, and if it is too deep, you will get a stack overflow because of too many recursion levels. Do a Breadth-first-search or depth-first-search. Also have a look at in-order, post-order and pre-order traversal techniques. Since this is probably a homework / lecture task, it will be good to look those keywords up. –  Christian Apr 12 '12 at 7:24
    
It is not a homework. I'm building a Menu on C# for a my own project. Yeah, it won't have 10000 items, but is always better optimize stuff into a project :) Why not recursion? Breadth-first-search or depth-first use it :O –  markzzz Apr 12 '12 at 7:28
1  
BFS/DFS do not necessarily use it. You can code both in an iterative way. Recursion is a nice and neat thing, however you have to always be aware that A) method calls cost performance (altough not much) and B) you cannot recurse endlessly. If you definately have less than 10000 items, you can savely use recursion. But if you are writing a more general tree traversal library(?) - just an example - you need to consider the depth of the tree –  Christian Apr 12 '12 at 7:31

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