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I've been trying to implement trapezoid rule for double integral. I've tried many approaches, but I can't get it to work right.

static double f(double x) {
    return Math.exp(- x * x / 2);
}

// trapezoid rule
static double trapezoid(double a, double b, int N) {
    double h = (b - a) / N;
    double sum = 0.5 *  h * (f(a) + f(b));
    for (int k = 1; k < N; k++)
        sum = sum + h * f(a + h*k);
    return sum;
}

I understand the method for a single variable integral, but I don't know how to do it for a 2D integral, say: x + (y*y). Could someone please explain it briefly?

share|improve this question
    
Are you asking how to apply this approximate technique to solve the integral over the volume f(x,y) = x + y^2 (or some other f(x,y))? –  null0pointer Apr 12 '12 at 8:49
    
I just made up example of some simple f(x,y) function, because I don't understand the principle it seems. –  stiv Apr 12 '12 at 9:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're intent on using the trapezoid rule then you would do it like so:

// The example function you provided.
public double f(double x, double y) {
    return x + y * y;
}

/**
 * Finds the volume under the surface described by the function f(x, y) for a <= x <= b, c <= y <= d.
 * Using xSegs number of segments across the x axis and ySegs number of segments across the y axis. 
 * @param a The lower bound of x.
 * @param b The upper bound of x.
 * @param c The lower bound of y.
 * @param d The upper bound of y.
 * @param xSegs The number of segments in the x axis.
 * @param ySegs The number of segments in the y axis.
 * @return The volume under f(x, y).
 */
public double trapezoidRule(double a, double b, double c, double d, int xSegs, int ySegs) {
    double xSegSize = (b - a) / xSegs; // length of an x segment.
    double ySegSize = (d - c) / ySegs; // length of a y segment.
    double volume = 0; // volume under the surface.

    for (int i = 0; i < xSegs; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < ySegs; j++) {
            double height = f(a + (xSegSize * i), c + (ySegSize * j));
            height += f(a + (xSegSize * (i + 1)), c + (ySegSize * j));
            height += f(a + (xSegSize * (i + 1)), c + (ySegSize * (j + 1)));
            height += f(a + (xSegSize * i), c + (ySegSize * (j + 1)));
            height /= 4;

            // height is the average value of the corners of the current segment.
            // We can use the average value since a box of this height has the same volume as the original segment shape.

            // Add the volume of the box to the volume.
            volume += xSegSize * ySegSize * height;
        }
    }

    return volume;
}

Hope this helps. Feel free to ask any questions you may have about my code (warning: The code is untested).

share|improve this answer
    
thx null0pointer, I'll implemet your code and get back at you if I have some problems –  stiv Apr 18 '12 at 8:22
    
your code works perfectly, and I have to say a very smart approach by avoiding messy inner sums –  stiv Apr 22 '12 at 12:33
    
Glad to hear it works :) –  null0pointer Apr 27 '12 at 16:19

Many ways to do it.

If you already know it for 1d you could make it like this:

  1. write a function g(x) that calculates the 1d integral over f(x,y) for a fixed x
  2. then integrate the 1d integral over g(x)
  3. Success :)

That way you can basically have as many dimensions as you like. Though it scales poorly. For larger problems it might be neccesary to use monte carlo integration.

share|improve this answer
    
Well the method is good. If you post your code we could have a look if anyone spots a problem. –  bdecaf Apr 12 '12 at 9:15
    
Here's my attempt, simimar to your suggestion, but when I check in Mathematica it doesen't add up –  stiv Apr 12 '12 at 9:22
    
static double f(double x, double y) { return x * (y+y); } // trapezoid rule static double trapezoid(double a, double b, int N) { double h = (b - a) / N; double sum = 0.5 * h * (f(a,a) + f(b,b)); double sum1 = 0.5 * h * (f(a,a) + f(b,b)); for (int k = 1; k < N; k++) { sum = sum + h * f(a + h*k, a); for(int j = 1; j < N; j++) { sum1 = sum1 + h * f(a + h*k, a + j*k); } } return sum + sum1; } –  stiv Apr 12 '12 at 9:29
    
I think you should write it out. (also maybe add it to the question for nice formatting). I think the problems is with your sums. it should be double sum = 0.5 * h * (sum1(at x=a) + sum1(at x=b)); and also double sum1 = 0.5 * h * (f(current x,a) + f(current x,b)); –  bdecaf Apr 12 '12 at 9:36
    
Also it should be sum = sum + h*sum1(at current x) - what you are returning is the sum over two 1d integrals and not what you asked for. –  bdecaf Apr 12 '12 at 9:40

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