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I am looking for a nice way to pretty print a Map.

map.toString() will give me: {key1=value1, key2=value2, key3=value3}

I want to have more freedom in my map entry values so I am looking for something more like this: key1="value1", key2="value2", key3="value3"

I wrote this little piece of code:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
Iterator<Entry<String, String>> iter = map.entrySet().iterator();
while (iter.hasNext()) {
    Entry<String, String> entry = iter.next();
    sb.append(entry.getKey());
    sb.append('=').append('"');
    sb.append(entry.getValue());
    sb.append('"');
    if (iter.hasNext()) {
        sb.append(',').append(' ');
    }
}
return sb.toString();

But I am sure there is a more elegant and concise way to do this.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Or put your logic into a tidy little class.

public class PrettyPrintingMap<K, V> {
    private Map<K, V> map;

    public PrettyPrintingMap(Map<K, V> map) {
        this.map = map;
    }

    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        Iterator<Entry<K, V>> iter = map.entrySet().iterator();
        while (iter.hasNext()) {
            Entry<K, V> entry = iter.next();
            sb.append(entry.getKey());
            sb.append('=').append('"');
            sb.append(entry.getValue());
            sb.append('"');
            if (iter.hasNext()) {
                sb.append(',').append(' ');
            }
        }
        return sb.toString();

    }
}

Usage:

Map<String, String> myMap = new HashMap<String, String>();

System.out.println(new PrettyPrintingMap<String, String>(myMap));

Note: You can also put that logic into a utility method.

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Arrays.toString(map.entrySet().toArray())
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Have a look at the Guava library:

Joiner.MapJoiner mapJoiner = Joiner.on(',').withKeyValueSeparator("=");
System.out.println(mapJoiner.join(map));
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Apache libraries to the rescue!

MapUtils.debugPrint(System.out, "myMap", map);

All you need Apache commons-collections library (project link)

Maven users can add the library using this dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>commons-collections</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-collections</artifactId>
    <version>3.2.1</version>
</dependency>
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Look at the code for HashMap#toString() and AbstractMap#toString() in the OpenJDK sources:

class java.util.HashMap.Entry<K,V> implements Map.Entry<K,V> {
       public final String toString() {
           return getKey() + "=" + getValue();
       }
   }
 class java.util.AbstractMap<K,V> {
     public String toString() {
         Iterator<Entry<K,V>> i = entrySet().iterator();
         if (! i.hasNext())
            return "{}";

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.append('{');
        for (;;) {
            Entry<K,V> e = i.next();
            K key = e.getKey();
            V value = e.getValue();
            sb.append(key   == this ? "(this Map)" : key);
            sb.append('=');
            sb.append(value == this ? "(this Map)" : value);
            if (! i.hasNext())
                return sb.append('}').toString();
            sb.append(", ");
        }
    }
}

So if the guys from OpenJDK did not find a more elegant way to do this, there is none :-)

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You should be able to do what you want by doing:

System.out.println(map) for example

As long as ALL your objects in the map have overiden the toString method you would see:
{key1=value1, key2=value2} in a meaningfull manner

If this is for your code, then overiding toString is a good habit and I suggest you go for that instead.

For your example where your objects are Strings you should be fine without anything else.
I.e. System.out.println(map) would print exactly what you need without any extra code

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1  
his keys and values are strings; I think he got the toString method covered tbh. –  Tom Apr 12 '12 at 8:53
    
You are right, but perhaps he copied a trivial example to make his point.But I update answer –  Cratylus Apr 12 '12 at 8:54
    
Yes, I should have indicated that my map is Map<String,String>. But I also indicated that I want more freedom in my entry values, for example having comma separated lists within an entry's value. So Map.toString() won't do. –  space_monkey Apr 12 '12 at 8:58
    
Interface java.util.Map has no contract regarding toString(), so it's up to the actual Map implementation what System.out.println(map) -> PrintStream.println(map) -> String.valueOf(map) -> map.toString() will cause. It happens that the often-used java.util.AbstractMap provides a nice string representation for toString(). ... Other Map implementations may fall back to Object.toString(), which results in the not-so-informative com.example.MyMap@4e8c0de. –  Abdull Sep 26 '13 at 10:26
public void printMapV2 (Map <?, ?> map) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(128);
    sb.append("{");
    for (Map.Entry<?,?> entry : map.entrySet()) {
        if (sb.length()>1) {
            sb.append(", ");
        }
        sb.append(entry.getKey()).append("=").append(entry.getValue());
    }
    sb.append("}");
    System.out.println(sb);
}
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I guess something like this would be cleaner, and provide you with more flexibility with the output format (simply change template):

    String template = "%s=\"%s\",";
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (Entry e : map.entrySet()) {
        sb.append(String.format(template, e.getKey(), e.getValue()));
    }
    if (sb.length() > 0) {
        sb.deleteCharAt(sb.length() - 1); // Ugly way to remove the last comma
    }
    return sb.toString();

I know having to remove the last comma is ugly, but I think it's cleaner than alternatives like the one in this solution or manually using an iterator.

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As a quick and dirty solution leveraging existing infrastructure, you can wrap your uglyPrintedMap into a java.util.HashMap, then use toString().

uglyPrintedMap.toString(); // ugly
System.out.println( uglyPrintedMap ); // prints in an ugly manner

new HashMap<Object, Object>(jobDataMap).toString(); // pretty
System.out.println( new HashMap<Object, Object>(uglyPrintedMap) ); // prints in a pretty manner
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