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I have a class that is intended to be used for a future internal authentication library ( I know there are already such existing libs ). So to make things as simple as possible to the developers using it in many coming future projects to make use of this library I had in mind them defining an enum with roles, simple example, the role sysadmin:

// Not a project specific class, but Auth is intended to be part of the library
class Auth {

        public static enum AUTH_ROLE {
            sysadmin( new Rule(AdminController.class, "*") );

            private String name;

            AUTH_ROLE() {
                name = this.name();
                Roles.add( name );
            }
            AUTH_ROLE(String name) {
                this.name = name;
                Roles.add( name );
            }

            AUTH_ROLE(Rule rule) {
                name = this.name();
                Roles.add( name, rule );
            }
            AUTH_ROLE(String name, Rule rule) {
                this.name = name;
                Roles.add( name, rule );
            }
            public String getName() {
                return name;
            }
        }

        public boolean hasRole(AUTH_ROLE role) {

            String[] usersRoles = getLoggedInUsersRoles();

            for ( String userRole : usersRoles ) {
                if ( role.getName().equals(userRole) )
                    return true;
            }

            return false;
        }

    }

Now, as you can see, the enum AUTH_ROLE is currently *defined* in what is supposed to be a non project specific class, but the Auth class is supposed to be part of the library that is to be used by many projects.

The problem is that with the current design, I am forced to also define the roles and their rules in that same class, Auth, in order to define the method hasRole ( AUTH_ROLE ...) ...

What I would like to do, is to have this enum with all the current logic in it defined ONCE for ALL PROJECTS and allow for the developers in new projects to be able to simply just define the roles and their rules.

The problem I believe exists, is that you cannot extend an enum in Java, so all that in the enum logic ( although simple, not the point! ) actually has to be repeated for each new project and possibly implement and interface provided in the library.

If it were possible to extend, then a new enum would have been able to simply define those roles, that is :

public enum AUTH_ROLE extends authlibrary.Auth.AUTH_ROLE {
    sysadmin( new Rule(AdminController.class, "*") );
} 

The other option, as I just mentioned, is to define an interface for the enum to implement, although as you can understand we end up with an implementation for each new project, be it as simple as copy and paste.

I am not interested in converting stuff to string or number back and forth before calling the method and what not... This question is not so much about how you can circumvent *the limitations* of the language, but merely to agree/accept that his is a limitation that would otherwise have resulted in cleaner code.

So, does anyone agree with that in this particular case, extending/including another enum would have been benefitial that would have resulted in less code?

Ps. I might be an idiot, so I want to reserve the right call myself an idiot :)

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closed as not constructive by duffymo, Philipp Reichart, casperOne Apr 14 '12 at 13:27

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3  
Any reason you're not following normal Java naming conventions? It's making the code harder to follow than it needs to be for me... What is Roles here? –  Jon Skeet Apr 12 '12 at 9:11
1  
If you could do this, would your "base" enum have any values? If not, that really feels like a design smell to start with... –  Jon Skeet Apr 12 '12 at 9:13
    
Roles is not relevant here. No, the base enum would not have any values. What is the design smell? Your suggestion is to implement an interface for each new project? I would like you to show me a better way to accomblish this that would allow easy access to the defined roles, without having to resort to passing around strings, and without forcing an implementation or copy and paste of code for each new project... –  momo Apr 12 '12 at 9:27
5  
Roles is absolutely relevant here, because it sounds like the logic could potentially go there instead. An enum with no values is a design smell as an enum is meant to represent a fixed set of values - when there aren't any, that's odd. –  Jon Skeet Apr 12 '12 at 9:30

2 Answers 2

Ask yourself this question: why do you need this to be an enum? If your code is not dealing with a predefined, known set of items that can never be extended, then what you have isn't really a good fit for an enum at all, and you may be better off with singleton objects extending a predefined base class.

If you're not using the useful features of enums -- the inbuilt string/ordinal conversion stuff -- why use them at all? And those useful features can't work in the situation you describe, because they require generation of code that needs to know the names of all the enum values, which now can't happen.

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I don't see how this will be valuable. I don't think that inheritance or extending is always the answer. If the enum needs more values, add them. I don't agree that the code is cleaner, or that this represents a serious limitation in the language.

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I don't think you got the point. How do I add values to the enum when the enum is not defined in my project, but instead it is defined in the library... following? –  momo Apr 12 '12 at 9:21
1  
Yes, I got it. I still don't think it's valuable. –  duffymo Apr 12 '12 at 9:22
    
Ok, could you elaborate or provide me with an example based on the code above how such a library could be designed and used in many projects to come without redundancy? –  momo Apr 12 '12 at 9:28
1  
I'm not sure that I agree this ought to be in an enum. It's not the place for a protracted back and forth, either. You realize, of course, that your question is subjective. –  duffymo Apr 12 '12 at 9:45

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