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my app has a button that checks whether an entered value is correct. sometimes it causes it to crash, but the strange thing is that it happens at irregular intervals (sometimes on the third iteration, sometimes the tenth, sometimes never).

i get a EXC_BAD_ACCESS error in the debugger. so it seems like something is being released when it shouldn't be. the button calls this function:

- (IBAction)checkValue:(id)sender{
int actualDifference = [firstNumberString intValue] - [secondNumberString intValue];
actualDifferenceAsString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", actualDifference];
if ([answerTextField.text isEqualToString:actualDifferenceAsString])
{
    UIAlertView *correctAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"matches"
            message:@"next value."
            delegate:nil
            cancelButtonTitle:@"ok" 
            otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [correctAlert show];
    [correctAlert release];
}
else
{
    UIAlertView *incorrectAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc]
    initWithTitle:@"does not match"
            message:@"next value."
        delegate:nil
            cancelButtonTitle:@"ok"
            otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [incorrectAlert show];
    [incorrectAlert release];
}

using zombies pointed to the first statement:

int actualDifference = [firstNumberString intValue] - [secondNumberString intValue];

does anyone know what the problem might be?

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what line is highlighted when you get the exc_bad_access? –  Manuel Apr 12 '12 at 9:41
1  
Did you debug using breakpoints? See in which line the app crashes? and the print value of firstNumberString, secondNumberString, actualDifferenceAsString –  mChopsey Apr 12 '12 at 9:43
    
no line is highlighted. the values of firstNumberString and secondNumberString are set randomly in a different method using arc4random(). –  henry bemis Apr 13 '12 at 5:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If zombies are detected in the first line, that means some other part of your program is releasing firstNumberString or secondNumberString. That's where the problem starts, but it only shows up here, when you later try to access those values. Where else do you work with those strings? Do you ever release them?

For overall safety, they should probably be assigned properties, not member variables.

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yes. they are assigned as properties in the header file. i assign them random values in a different method. the only time i release those strings is in the dealloc() method. i set them both to nil in the viewDidUnload(). –  henry bemis Apr 13 '12 at 5:40
    
firstNumberString and secondNumberString may be defined as properties, but here you are accessing them as variables. Use self.firstNumberString or [self firstNumberString] to read the property, and, more importantly self.firstNumberString = or [self setFirstNumberString:] where you set its value. For details, see the question and answer Property attribute “retain” doesn't seem to be working? –  Dondragmer Apr 13 '12 at 5:50
    
it was hard to tell whether it was working or not since it would run fine for a few iterations and then end abruptly when i had this problem, but i think that did fix it. thanks! i'm learning objective-c on the fly, and it's more different from other languages than i expected. can you recommend a good resource for learning concepts like this? maybe a strong objective-c fundamentals book? thanks again! –  henry bemis Apr 13 '12 at 6:24
    
The official source for this is Apple's Advanced Memory Management Guide. The main book I learnt from is out of date and hasn't been updated, and SO probably isn't the forum for discussing the relative merits of different books. However, look to the right. Under the Related heading, there's a long list of EXC_BAD_ACCESS questions. There's some education, packaged in convenient 5-minute chunks... –  Dondragmer Apr 13 '12 at 6:58

Change it into

 NSInteger actualDifference = [firstNumberString intValue] - [secondNumberString intValue];  //change int to NSInteger
NSString *actualDifferenceAsString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", actualDifference];
if ([answerTextField.text isEqualToString:actualDifferenceAsString])
{
    UIAlertView *correctAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"matches"
                                                           message:@"next value."
                                                          delegate:nil
                                                 cancelButtonTitle:@"ok" 
                                                 otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [correctAlert show];
    [correctAlert release];
}
else
{
    UIAlertView *incorrectAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc]
                                   initWithTitle:@"does not match"
                                   message:@"next value."
                                   delegate:nil
                                   cancelButtonTitle:@"ok"
                                   otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [incorrectAlert show];
    [incorrectAlert release];
}

you get this code. It worked for me...

share|improve this answer
    
NSInteger is typedef int (as of iOS 5.1), so this change has no effect. This code has no problems and does not need fixing. The app is crashing because of memory management elsewhere. –  Dondragmer Apr 12 '12 at 12:54
    
right. i tried that already, and it still ends abruptly. –  henry bemis Apr 13 '12 at 5:38

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