Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I happened to see a div which had the style clear:both! What is the use of clear in style?

<div style="clear:both">
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 163 down vote accepted

clear:both makes the element drop below any floated elements that precede it in the document.

You can also use clear:left or clear:right to make it drop below only those elements that have been floated left or right.

+------------+ +--------------------+
|            | |                    |
| float:left | |   without clear    |
|            | |                    |
|            | +--------------------+
|            | +--------------------+
|            | |                    |
|            | |  with clear:right  |
|            | |  (no effect here,  |
|            | |   as there is no   |
|            | |   float:right      |
|            | |   element)         |
|            | |                    |
|            | +--------------------+
|            |
+------------+
+---------------------+
|                     |
|   with clear:left   |
|    or clear:both    |
|                     |
+---------------------+
share|improve this answer
23  
+1 for the schematic answer. nice explanation –  Nuno Furtado Jun 18 '09 at 11:34
1  
BEWARE THE FLOAT BUG! positioniseverything.net/explorer/floatIndent.html –  Jason Jul 22 '09 at 23:19
2  
Also it makes parent div to fit the height. –  Oleg Jan 19 '12 at 15:56
    
nice drawing demo –  HTML Developer Mar 19 '13 at 10:16

Just to add to RichieHindle's answer, check out Floatutorial, which walks you through how CSS floating and clearing works.

share|improve this answer

When you use float without width, there remains some space in that row. To block this space you can use clear:both; in next element.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.