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My intention is to have some base class CBaseClass that, amongst other things, serves as a container to some members of type CBaseMember; then to derive a CDerivedClass : public CBaseClass that holds CDerivedMember : public CBaseMember.

I can't use a pointer to CBaseMember and initialize it with a CDerivedMember object in CDerivedClass because it's a multiple inheritance situation, CDerivedMember has an additional interface (a pure abstract base class) that is irrelevant to CBaseClass implementation but needs to be visible to CDerivedClass. Lots of dirty casting is something that I would very much like to avoid.

My solution to this problem was to make CBaseClass a template, like this:

//declaration
template <class Member>
CBaseClass
{
protected:
    virtual void GenericMethod();
    virtual void VirtualMethod() = 0;

    Member* member;
};

//definition
template <class Member>
void CBaseClass<Member>::GenericMethod()
{
    member->SomeMemberMethod();
}

and then to inherit CDerivedClass from it, like this:

//declaration
CDerivedClass : public CBaseClass<CDerivedMember>
{
protected:
    virtual void VirtualMethod();
};

//definition
void CDerivedClass::VirtualMethod()
{
    member->SomeDerivedMethod();
}

Predictably, this doesn't work (CBaseClass<CDerivedMember>::GenericMethod() is unresolved, for obivious reasons), but unfortunatly I don't know how to change my code to mean what I intend for it to mean.

Can anyone please explain how those things are done properly - or suggest another solution for my problem?

Thanks!

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2  
What's the "obvious reason" that GenericMethod is unresolved? –  Kerrek SB Apr 12 '12 at 10:24
2  
In addition to @KerrekSB's comment, did you leave out the class keyword in your declarations out intentionally? –  bitmask Apr 12 '12 at 10:31
    
I feel that your "Obvious reason" is that you've put the definition in a .cpp file, forgetting that templated definitions should go to the header. –  enobayram Apr 12 '12 at 10:42
    
@KerrekSB come to think of it, not that obvious. The code by xzgyb below compiles just fine, so now I'm trying to figure out how is it any different from my actual code. –  obamator Apr 12 '12 at 10:43
1  
I'm glad it helped, but know that using templates in this situation deprives you of dynamic polymorphism. CBaseClass types with different template arguments are totally unrelated types. –  enobayram Apr 12 '12 at 10:54

2 Answers 2

I suspect that you want to get rid of the templates, because the snippet you provided would work (if you added the class keyword to the declaration of your types).

If you want to avoid downcasts from CBaseMember* to CDerivedMember*, you can approach the situation with dynamic binding and covariance:

class CBaseClass {
  private:
    CBaseMember* const baseMember;
  protected:
    virtual CBaseMember* member() const {
    //      ^^^^^^^^^^^
      return baseMember;
    }
    /* everything else you need here. Just never ever access `baseMember` directly */
};
class CDerivedClass : public CBaseClass {
  private:
    CDerivedMember* const derivedMember;
  protected:
    virtual CDerivedMember* member() const {
    //      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
      return derivedMember;
    }
    /* everything else you need here. Just never ever access `derivedMember` directly */
};

However, this only works if you will never change the member to point somewhere else, because you cannot pull this trick with a setter: virtual void CBaseClass::member(CBaseMember*) cannot be overridden with virtual void CDerivedClass::member(CDerivedMember*).

Note that you will still be carrying the baseMember pointer in your CDerivedClass around, although it is never ever used. So if memory is important to you, this might not be viable.

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Well, you could keep the dirty typecasts at one place, encapsulated in your class. Therefore, it's not really dirty anymore.

class CBaseMember {
public:
    virtual void SomeMemberMethod(){}
};

class CDerivedMember : public CBaseMember {
public:
    virtual void SomeMemberMethod() { /* do other stuff */ }
    virtual void SomeDerivedMethod() {}
};

//declaration
class CBaseClass
{
protected:
    virtual void GenericMethod();
    virtual void VirtualMethod() = 0;

    CBaseMember* member;
    virtual CBaseMember * getMember() {
    return member;
    }
};

//definition
void CBaseClass::GenericMethod()
{
    getMember()->SomeMemberMethod();
}

//declaration
class CDerivedClass : public CBaseClass
{
protected:
    virtual void VirtualMethod();
    virtual CDerivedMember * getMember() {return static_cast<CDerivedMember *>(member);}
};

//definition
void CDerivedClass::VirtualMethod()
{
    getMember()->SomeDerivedMethod();
}

In summary, you do the dirty typecasting inside the getMember() method of the derived class. At that point you should be sure that the type of the member is CDerivedMember anyway. So, as long as you know that the pointer you have is of type CDerivedClass you will have access to its CDerivedMember without typecasting. If you have to fall back to a CBaseClass pointer, you'll naturally fall back to the CBaseMember while accessing its member.

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Yes, but that's still typecasting. I would know :) –  obamator Apr 12 '12 at 10:51
    
Don't be afraid of type casting, if you encapsulate it inside a class properly. Inside CDerivedClass, make sure that member is pointing to a derived member object AT ALL TIMES, then the static_cast is totally safe. –  enobayram Apr 12 '12 at 10:58
    
but but but static_cast<CDerivedMember*>(CBaseMember* member) implies a conversion from a virtual base class, which is not allowed, and dynamic_cast is slow and rtti-dependent. Such a hard choice :( –  obamator Apr 12 '12 at 11:20
    
Hmm, I see. If you're OK with sparing some more space for a redundant pointer, you could create a separate CDerivedMember * member, and initialize it to point to your member data. Then you could return it in getMember. This is basically the memory trade-off. You have to trade-off something if you want dynamic polymorphism. –  enobayram Apr 12 '12 at 13:29

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