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There are two related excises in The Algorithm Design Manual.

Basically, I know how to solve the first excise, but I don't know how to solve the 2nd one using the first one's solution as a hint.

Excise of an arithmetic expression tree

arithmetic expression tree

Above is an arithmetic expression tree. Suppose an arithmetic expression is given as a tree. Each leaf is an integer and each internal node is one of the standard arithmetical operations (+,−,∗,/). For example, the expression 2 + 3 ∗ 4 + (3 ∗ 4)/5 is represented by the tree in above Figure. Give an O(n) algorithm for evaluating such an expression, where there are n nodes in the tree.

Ok, this is not hard. My solution is like this:

    public float evaluate() {
        return evaluate(root);
    }

    private float evaluate(Node_EX _node) {
        if (_node.left == null || _node.right == null)
            return Float.parseFloat(_node.key);
        String op = _node.key;
        if (op == "+") {
            return evaluate(_node.left) + evaluate(_node.right);
        } else if (op == "-") {
            return evaluate(_node.left) - evaluate(_node.right);
        } else if (op == "*") {
            return evaluate(_node.left) * evaluate(_node.right);
        } else {
            return evaluate(_node.left) / evaluate(_node.right);
        }
    }

I just use recursive way to solve the expression tree for the result.

Excise of an arithmetic expression DAG

arithmetic expression dag

Suppose an arithmetic expression is given as a DAG (directed acyclic graph) with common subexpressions removed. Each leaf is an integer and each internal node is one of the standard arithmetical operations (+,−,∗,/). For example, the expression 2 + 3 ∗ 4 + (3 ∗ 4)/5 is represented by the DAG in above Figure. Give an O(n + m) algorithm for evaluating such a DAG, where there are n nodes and m edges in the DAG. Hint: modify an algorithm for the tree case to achieve the desired efficiency.

Ok, there is such a hint in the description: Hint: modify an algorithm for the tree case to achieve the desired efficiency.

I am quite confused by this hint, actually. For a typical tree related thing, we normally can use recursive to solve. However, if this is a graph, my first intuitive is to use BFS or DFS to solve it. Then how can I relate BFS or DFS to the tree, though DFS is actually a recursive?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

I believe, to achieve the desired efficiency, the problem wants you to avoid re-evaluating parts of the tree you've already visited. Once you've reached and evaluated some sub-tree in the DAG (every node in the tree represents the sub-tree rooted at that node), you can store the resulting value and associate it with that sub-tree. Then, when you visit it again, you can check whether you've pre-computed that value and just retrieve it rather than evaluating it again.

There are many different ways you can store and retrieve these values a simple one being to modify the structure of a node to allow for a cacheable result.

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do you think my solution to the tree one is linear? – Jackson Tale Apr 12 '12 at 10:59
    
Yes, your solution is linear for a tree because no node will be visited more than once. But for a DAG, in the worst case it is just a DFS and can become exponential. Imagine an expression tree that was really tall. A DFS will traverse very many different paths to reach the leaves. – Felix Fung Apr 12 '12 at 11:05
    
DFS visits each leaf only once; it does not require exponential time. – JeffE Oct 24 '14 at 14:37
    
@JeffE, poor wording on my part. I meant only to say that the recursive algorithm presented by the question would require exponential time in the case of a DAG. – Felix Fung Oct 24 '14 at 18:33

The problem can be solved using the DFS on given DAG.

  • We will save re-calculations on the common portions of the airthmetic expression.

  • For example: While doing DFS when * will be re-encountered from the ( / ) node. The edge between ( / ) and * is a cross-edge, which means that the left and right subtrees of (*) are already evaluated. Thus we will take advantage of this and will save on re-calculation.

  • However to achieve this we need to save the results of the operation on the nodes.

  • The complexity is O(n+m) since it is normal DFS traversal with some extra memory used for storing the intermediate results.

Hope this helps.

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