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Is the registers (like eax, ebx, ecx, edx, esp, ebp, ...etc..) are physically avaialble within the processor, or it is an virtual memory location in the programming view?

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What would you like to do with these registers? These are real not in memory. You need to write some assebler to directly access registers –  Cougar Apr 12 '12 at 10:48
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5 Answers

The registers you specified are all physically available on the Intel processor, not virtual memory. The concept of virtual memory doesn't really apply here.

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They are very much physically present inside the Intel CPU. And Linux runs on top of those CPUs.

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They are available in the processor. Depending on the processor you might have additional registers or fewer than the ones you named.

Wikipedia "Processor register":

In computer architecture, a processor register is a small amount of storage available as part of a CPU or other digital processor. Such registers are (typically) addressed by mechanisms other than main memory and can be accessed more quickly. Almost all computers, load-store architecture or not, load data from a larger memory into registers where it is used for arithmetic, manipulated, or tested, by some machine instruction.

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Registers are hardware platform specified. Eax, ebx or anything else like rax, rbx are x86 registers They really exist in our computer, and physically avaialble In x86 registers are not mapped into memory

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Registers are physical, they are a part of the machine's architecture, not of the OS or any other software. Due to register renaming, they may not have a single corresponding piece of silicon on the chip, but from the point of view of any software (including OS), they are a part of the hardware and are not the same as memory addresses.

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