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I want to understand principles of Clock cache replacement policy.

What happens whrn it start working? We have for example cache size = 5. So, at first we add 5 random objects to the cache. Am I true when I think that all these objects at first will habe clockbit = 0? Then when sixth object comes, we must find a place for it. Should we try to find same object in cache without Clock hand (just ifInCache(comingObject))? What happens if there is no such object in cache? Where is a start position for Clock hand?

I read a lot of articles and just want to understand main questions about Clock.

share|improve this question
    
Thank you very much, all answers were very usefull. My english is not good, so, I can understand all gramatics in english articles, but sometimes can't understand whole sence. – golgofa Apr 12 '12 at 11:40
    
And some more questions. I use Clock to implement Clock-Pro cache replacement. Main article is to complicated, and real implementation is only i've seen in linux kernel. Do anyone tried something in Java? Most troubles were with special terms: i.e. I haven' seen explanation fo what is Resident and non-resident page. And nowhere seen simple examples of work. – golgofa Apr 12 '12 at 11:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you are making things complicated for yourself. The reason people use this approach is that it is VERY simple.

This avoid replacing an entriy which was recently used.

private final Object[] objects = new Object[5];
private final boolean[] referenced = new boolean[objects.length];
private int clock = 0;

public Object getOrCache(Object obj) {
    for (int i = 0, objectsLength = objects.length; i < objectsLength; i++) {
        Object o = objects[i];
        if (obj.equals(o)) {
            referenced[i] = true;
            return obj;
        }
    }
    while(referenced[clock]) {
        referenced[clock] = false;
        incrClock();
    }
    objects[clock] = obj;
    incrClock();
    return obj;
}

private void incrClock() {
    if (++clock >= objects.length)
        clock = 0;
}

This doesn't bother.

private final Object[] objects= new Object[5];
private int clock = 0;

public Object getOrCache(Object obj) {
   for(Object o: objects) 
       if (obj.equals(o))
           return obj;
   objects[clock++ % objects.length] = obj;
   return obj;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't there be a referenced bit that is checked and the object would only be replaced if it reference bit is 0? Thus you'd increment clock until you find an entry with referenced = 0 (which might be the first element if all had been referenced and thus the first one would get its referenced bit set to 0 in the first round). – Thomas Apr 12 '12 at 11:15
    
You could do that to to do a pseudo least recently used. I will edit. – Peter Lawrey Apr 12 '12 at 11:30
    
This implementation, as I understand, for smth like simple FIFO. And I should implement reference bits, right? – golgofa Apr 12 '12 at 11:35
    
@golgofa I have added reference bits as well. – Peter Lawrey Apr 12 '12 at 11:37

Am I true when I think that all these objects at first will habe clockbit = 0?

If they are not referenced, then yes.

Should we try to find same object in cache without Clock hand (just ifInCache(comingObject))?

Yes, you have to check if the object is in the cache already. If so, the reference bit (clockbit) would be set to 1.

What happens if there is no such object in cache? Where is a start position for Clock hand?

If the object is not already in the cache you check the object at the clock hand. The position of the hand would be the last position in the cache if it is not full yet and otherwise remain the same between two cache lookups (it would be incremented by the lookups themselves).

Example (cache size = 5):

  • add A -> hand at 0 before and at 1 after
  • add B -> hand at 1 before and at 2 after
  • add C -> hand at 2 before and at 3 after
  • add D -> hand at 3 before and at 4 after
  • add E -> hand at 4 before and at 0 after
  • add F -> hand at 0, check referenced bit of A, if it is 0 replace and increment hand, otherwise increment hand only -> afterwards hand is at 1

Note that if all objects have their reference bit set to 1 the object at the hand will be replaced since after checking an object its reference bit is set to 0 and thus the second time the object is checked the bit will be 0.

Edit:

Here's an extended/adjusted version of @PeterLawrey's code:

private final Object[] objects= new Object[5]; 
private final boolean[] referenced = new boolean[5]; //boolean for simplicity
private int clock = 0;

public Object getOrCache(Object obj) {
   for(int i = 0; i < objects.length; ++i) {
     if (obj.equals(objects[i])) {
       referenced[i] = true; //object has been referenced, note that this is for simplicity and could be optimized
       return obj;
     }
   }

   //loop over the entries until there is a non-referenced one
   //reference flags are removed in the process
   while( referenced[clock] ) {
     referenced[clock] = false;
     clock = (clock + 1) % objects.length; //for clarity
   }

   //replace the object at the current clock position and increment clock
   objects[clock] = obj;
   referenced[clock] = true;
   clock = (clock + 1) % objects.length; //for clarity

   return obj;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Great thanks! It's very useful – golgofa Apr 12 '12 at 11:37
    
You increment the clock two different ways, I suspect the first is incorrect. ;) – Peter Lawrey Apr 12 '12 at 11:38
    
Arrays don't have an indexOf method. – Peter Lawrey Apr 12 '12 at 11:39
1  
@PeterLawrey you're right, I'll fix that :) - I'm so used to work with collections rather than arrays that I totally forgot we have an array here. – Thomas Apr 12 '12 at 11:39

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