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This is surely a JS beginner question.

My issue is I want to use the value of the variable type to access the relevant checkbox; however it is treating the variable as a string. I have tried it to two ways.

function toggleGroup(type) {
    if (document.getElementById(type).checked == true){
        alert("foo");
    }
}

or

function toggleGroup(type) {
    if (document.nav.type.checked == true){
        alert("foo");   		
    }
}
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indeed. 'foo', for one, is a choice of the most sophisticated minds. –  jrharshath Jun 18 '09 at 12:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

We have no way of knowing how type should be treated - you haven't show us how the function is being called (in particular, we don't know what you are passing as its argument).

If it is a string (matching the id of an element), than document.getElementById(type).checked should work (although == true is redundant).

document.nav.type.checked should not work, because dot-notation property names are not interpolated. You have to use square bracket notation for that: document.forms.nav.elements[type].checked. This will match on name or id - if you have multiple elements with the same name, then document.forms.nav.elements[type] will be an object you can treat as an array (and won't have a checked property).

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you can as well compare with "true"

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Comparing with the string "true" would just require additional type conversion, make the code less clear, and imply that you could compare a false value with the string "false" and get a match. –  Quentin Jun 18 '09 at 12:01
    
("true" == true) is false –  Alsciende Jun 18 '09 at 12:24
    
oh, you need to use the getAttribute() method on the DOM element to use the string form "true". –  jrharshath Jun 18 '09 at 12:51
    
If a checked attribute is set on an element, then its value must be "checked", not "true" (browser bugs not withstanding) –  Quentin Jun 18 '09 at 13:47
    
mm hmm, right you are. –  jrharshath Jun 18 '09 at 14:18

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