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I am working on a program but can't understand working with pointers when classes are involved. I know I have to allocate memory for the pointer using new and am fine with this when not using classes. I can't find a simple tutorial to explain how to do this particular task though. Could someone please give me some help? This is the relevant snippets what I have done so far but it is outputting random characters:

"Hangman.c"
{

class Hangman
{
public:
...
char* remainingLetters();
Hangman()
 {
  char* remaining=new char[26];
 }
~Hangman();

private:
char* remaining;
}

"Hangman.cpp"
{

...
 char* Hangman::remainingLetters()
{
 ...does task to find remaining letters;

 return remaining;
 }

  ostream& operator<< (ostream &out, Hangman &game)
  {
    out << "Letters remaining are: " << game.remaining <<endl

    return out;
  }
}

"main.cpp"
{
...
cout << game;
...
}
share|improve this question
    
You shouldn't really be using pointers or new at all in C++, especially if you're a beginner. They're niche expert topics for library developers. –  Kerrek SB Apr 12 '12 at 11:43
    
Going with the theme of not using pointers, why not just declare the member variable as an array? I.e. char remaining[26]; Then you don't have to worry about things like memory leaks, like if you forget to free the memory in the destructor. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 12 '12 at 11:45
    
@JoachimPileborg I need to return an array each time the function is called, which can't be done in C++ if I remember correctly. That's why I am trying to use a pointer. Would it be possible to get an array output in this case? –  adohertyd Apr 12 '12 at 11:46
    
An array can be converted to a pointer of the same type, i.e. you can do something like char array[26]; char *pointer = array; printf("pointer[1] = '%c'\n", pointer[1]); –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 12 '12 at 11:50
    
@adohertyd - You can use a std::string to store your letters. There are no problems returning C++ strings, just arrays. –  Bo Persson Apr 12 '12 at 11:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're not initializing you member. You should have:

Hangman()
{
   remaining=new char[26];
}

Your version:

 Hangman()
 {
    char* remaining=new char[26];
 }

initializes a local variable called remaining, whose scope is the constructor.

Also you should delete[] the memory in the destructor and implement the copy constructor and assignment operator.

share|improve this answer
    
"Implement the copy constructor OR assignment operator" No!, it should be "Implement the copy constructor AND assignment operator" –  Alok Save Apr 12 '12 at 11:48
    
@Als obvious typo. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 12 '12 at 11:48
    
This is the correct answer. Still don't have the code working though. Have to do a lot more reading on this topic. Thanks for the input –  adohertyd Apr 12 '12 at 12:17
Hangman()
{
  char* remaining=new char[26];
}

In the constructor, you are initializing a local variable but not the class member. Also, every new/new[] should be associated with delete/delete[] respectively to avoid memory leaks. In stead of managing memory yourself, use smart pointers instead.

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1  
Or a std::string. –  Benjamin Bannier Apr 12 '12 at 11:52

Few important points:

  • You need to allocate memory using new [] to the pointer member in the constructor.
  • You need to deallocate the memory using delete [] in the destructor.
  • You need to follow the Rule of Three.

Also, note that creating a local pointer in the constructor with same name as your class member remaining is at best ambigiuos and you should rename it appropriately.

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Most of the problems go away if you use a C++ string instead of a C style array of char.

class Hangman 
{ 
public:
    std::string remainingLetters(); 

    Hangman()  { } 

private:
    std::string   remaining; 
};

"Hangman.cpp"

std::string Hangman::remainingLetters() 
{
    //  ...does task to find remaining letters;
   return remaining;  
} 
share|improve this answer

One side aspect is that by doing

remaining=new char[26];

you are reserving space for 25 letters (+ one 0-byte), which is probably not what you want...

Regards

Andreas

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