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I want to have my Perl script to be able to do this

./code1 param1 param2 param3 | perl myperlscript.pl param1 param2

So the Perl script ought to take 3 inputs:

  1. param1
  2. param2
  3. output of ./code1 param1 param2 param3

I have this in my Perl code but it goes awry:

my $param1 = $ARGV[0] || "control.fst";
my $param2  = $ARGV[1] || "target.fst";

my @control_header = `grep ">" $param1`;
my @target_header = `grep ">" $param2`;
# Later to do something with those arrays

while (<>) {
 # do something again
}

I am aware I can make temporary output for ./code1. But since the output is quite large I prefer to have it piped. Please advice what's the right way to do it.

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1  
Please explain what you mean by goes awry. What is your problem? –  Borodin Apr 12 '12 at 12:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

More perlish code would be:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $param1 = $ARGV[0] || "control.fst";
my $param2 = $ARGV[1] || "target.fst";

my @control_header;
my @target_header;

open FH, "<$param1" or die;
map { push @control_header, $1 if /^(.*?>.*?)[\n\r]*$/ } (<FH>);
close FH;

open FH, "<$param2" or die;
map { push @target_header,  $1 if /^(.*?>.*?)[\n\r]*$/ } (<FH>);
close FH;

...                                                                              

while (<STDIN>) {                                                                
  ...                                                                            
}                                                                                
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Optionally you can extend die output and replace die; with die "Cannot open file $param1"; or similar... –  Ωmega Apr 12 '12 at 13:36
2  
map in void context isn't very perish at all. –  brian d foy Apr 12 '12 at 21:41
    
You really shouldn't encourage using typeglob file handles or the two-parameter form of open. Also the die string should contain $! for information. –  Borodin Apr 13 '12 at 5:08

There are two options for you.

1) read STDIN

while (<STDIN>) {
chomp();  
# do something again

}

2) Call the first program from your Perl script and process its output. See recipe 16.05 in Perl Cookbook.

open(PRG,"./code1 param1 param2 param3|") or die $!;
while (<PRG>) {
chomp();  
# do something again

}
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While @ARGV isn't empty the <> operator will read from the files specified there. Reading continues from STDIN once @ARGV is exhausted.

If you empty @ARGV explicitly after you have read the @control_header and @target_header arrays the program should work as you expect. Alternatively you can read explicitly from STDIN using <STDIN>.

But I believe it is better to use Perl to read the information you need from the file parameters. This program demonstrates the idea

use strict;
use warnings;

my $param1 = shift || 'control.fst';
my @control_header = do {
  open my $fh, '<', $param1 or die qq(Unable to open file "$param1": $!);
  grep />/, <$fh>;
};

my $param2 = shift || 'target.fst';
my @target_header = do {
  open my $fh, '<', $param2 or die qq(Unable to open file "$param2": $!);
  grep />/, <$fh>;
};

while (<STDIN>) {
  # do something again
}
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In your case, remove param1 and param2 from @ARGV.

my $param1 = shift;
my $param2 = shift;

Now you can process the piped output from code1 using

while (<>) {
  ...;
}

A more general solution is to use bash process substitution as in

perl myperlscript.pl <(./other param1 param2) <(./code1 param1 param2 param3)

This makes the output of other and code1 emerge from named pipes that

while (<>) {
  ...;
}

will happily process.

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