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Please, observe:

CPython:

PS Z:\dev\poc\SDR> python
Python 2.7.1 (r271:86832, Nov 27 2010, 17:19:03) [MSC v.1500 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> from zipfile import ZipFile
>>> z=ZipFile('d:/aaa.zip')
>>> input=z.open(z.namelist()[0])
>>> next(input)
'aaa,bbb\n'
>>> next(input)
'123,456\n'
>>>

IronPython:

PS Z:\dev\poc\SDR> ipy64
IronPython 2.7.1 (2.7.0.40) on .NET 4.0.30319.225
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> from zipfile import ZipFile
>>> z=ZipFile('d:/aaa.zip')
>>> input=z.open(z.namelist()[0])
>>> next(input)
b'aaa,bbb\n'
>>> next(input)
'123,456\n'
>>>

Notice that IronPython displays the first line as b'aaa,bbb\n' whereas CPython does 'aaa,bbb\n'. This difference is extremely important, because the former is just bytes whereas the latter is a string.

How can I make IronPython treat the first line as a string as well?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Short answer:

str(next(input))

Longer answer: It's pretty weird that the first in is bytes but the second is a string. It's probably just a bug. Can you please open an issue with a self-contained reproduction?

share|improve this answer
    
Here you go - ironpython.codeplex.com/workitem/32570 – mark Apr 12 '12 at 15:26
    
Thanks! I'll schedule it for 2.7.3, but no promises. – Jeff Hardy Apr 12 '12 at 19:40

This does look strange, but in python 2.7, a regular string is a byte string. In fact, byte() is a synonym for str. And if you print repr(bytes("hello")) you will see 'hello', not b'hello'. In python 3 of course that's another story.

In short, you are getting a byte string in CPython already, so I believe there's no actual problem. (I'd certainly check if something is broken before spending more time trying to "fix" it). I don't use IronPython, but I have read that it uses unicode as the default type for strings (like Python 3). I'm concluding that b'string' in IronPython means the same thing as 'string' in CPython 2 (and 'string' means the same thing as CPython's u'string').

share|improve this answer
    
Note, that both IronPython and CPython display the second line the same. Besides, both python flavors should adher to the same specification - if one returns a string, the other should return a string as well, no matter the internal representation (Ascii or Unicode) as long as there is a conversion between the two. – mark Apr 12 '12 at 14:55
    
Oh, I'm sorry. NOW I see what you meant. IronPython is returning one bytestring and one regular. I saw some discussion about this in the forums, but I'm not sure what the conclusion was. – alexis Apr 12 '12 at 15:19
    
Here it is. Apparently the use of the python 3 character model exposes an inconsistency in some python modules, and this thread at least suggests just living with it: mail.python.org/pipermail/ironpython-users/2010-November/… – alexis Apr 12 '12 at 15:26

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