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Is there an inbuilt command to do this or has anyone had any luck with a script that does it?

I am looking to get counts of how many lines had how many occurrences of a specfic character. (sorted descending by the number of occurrences)

For example, with this sample file:

gkdjpgfdpgdp
fdkj
pgdppp
ppp
gfjkl

Suggested input (for the 'p' character)

bash/perl some_script_name "p" samplefile

Desired output:

occs     count
4          1
3          2
0          2

Update: How would you write a solution that worked off a 2 character string such as 'gd' not a just a specific character such as p?

share|improve this question
1  
Your update has an ambiguity. What if your 2-character string were pp? What would you want for the third and fourth lines? –  Michael J. Barber Apr 13 '12 at 10:22
1  
With the awk solutions, you just need to say -F 'gd' –  glenn jackman Apr 13 '12 at 12:50
    
@MichaelJ.Barber - if it were pp the 3rd line would be 1 occ and the 4th line would be 1 occ. Because the same individual character cannot be counted as part of 2 different occurrences. –  toop Apr 14 '12 at 1:46
    
In that case, use one of the awk solutions and change the string, as @glennjackman suggests. –  Michael J. Barber Apr 14 '12 at 6:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;

my $seq = shift @ARGV;
die unless defined $seq;

my %freq;

while ( my $line = <> ) {
    last unless $line =~ /\S/;        
    my $occurances = () = $line =~ /(\Q$seq\E)/g;
    $freq{ $occurances } += 1;
}

for my $occurances ( sort { $b <=> $a} keys %freq ) {
    print "$occurances:\t$freq{$occurances}\n";
}

If you want short, you can always use:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
$x=shift;/\S/&&++$f{$a=()=/(\Q$x\E)/g}while<>
;print"$_:\t$f{$_}\n"for sort{$b<=>$a}keys%f;

or, perl -e '$x=shift;/\S/&&++$f{$a=()=/(\Q$x\E)/g}while<>;print"$_:\t$f{$_}\n"for sort{$b<=>$a}keys%f' inputfile, but now I am getting silly.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see update to question. –  toop Apr 13 '12 at 9:54
    
There is a reason to variable that gets interpolated into the pattern is called $seq rather than $chr. –  Sinan Ünür Apr 13 '12 at 10:42

You could give the desired character as the field separator for awk, and do this:

awk -F 'p' '{ print NF-1 }' | 
  sort -k1nr | 
    uniq -c | 
      awk -v OFS="\t" 'BEGIN { print "occs", "count" } { print $2, $1 }'

For your sample data, it produces:

occs    count
4       1
3       2
0       2

If you want to count occurrences of multi-character strings, just give the desired string as the separator, e.g., awk -F 'gd' ... or awk -F 'pp' ....

share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice idea to use the target character as the field separator. –  glenn jackman Apr 12 '12 at 13:25
    
Please see update to question. –  toop Apr 13 '12 at 9:53
    
With awk, you can use a regular expression for the field separator, so could just use gd as the separator without change. It gets harder if you want to have something like pp as the separator. –  Michael J. Barber Apr 13 '12 at 10:20
    
To clarify, you can use a regular expression or a simple string. specifying -F 'pp' is not a problem: awk -F pp -v OFS=: '{$1=$1;print}' <<< "aaaappbbbbppcccc" –  glenn jackman Apr 13 '12 at 12:56
    
@glennjackman Regular expressions subsume simple strings, but I could have been clearer on that; thanks. The problem with pp is conceptual: does ppp count as 1 occurrence or 2? –  Michael J. Barber Apr 13 '12 at 14:43

Shortest solution so far:

perl -nE'say tr/p//' | sort -nr | uniq -c |
   awk 'BEGIN{print "occs","count"}{print $2,$1}' |
      column -t

For multiple characters, use a regex pattern:

perl -ple'$_ = () = /pg/g' | sort -nr | uniq -c |
   awk 'BEGIN{print "occs","count"}{print $2,$1}' |
      column -t

This one handles overlapping matches (e.g. it finds 3 "pp" in "pppp" instead of 2):

perl -ple'$_ = () = /(?=pp)/g' | sort -nr | uniq -c |
   awk 'BEGIN{print "occs","count"}{print $2,$1}' |
      column -t

Original cryptic but short pure-Perl version:

perl -nE'
   ++$c{ () = /pg/g };
}{
   say "occs\tcount";
   say "$_\t$c{$_}" for sort { $b <=> $a } keys %c;
'

share|improve this answer
    
Please see update to question. –  toop Apr 13 '12 at 9:54
    
@toop, Answer updated. –  ikegami Apr 13 '12 at 16:12
    
actually I would prefer it to find it finds 2 "pp" in "pppp" instead of 3. –  toop Apr 14 '12 at 1:42
    
@toop, well, code to do that is already there. Is there something else you want? –  ikegami Apr 14 '12 at 3:09
    
you said "(e.g. it finds 3 "pp" in "pppp" instead of 2)" –  toop Apr 14 '12 at 4:32

Can to it in one gawk process (well, with a sort coprocess)

gawk -F p -v OFS='\t' '
    { count[NF-1]++ }
    END {
        print "occs", "count"
        coproc = "sort -rn"
        for (n in count)
            print n, count[n] |& coproc
        close(coproc, "to")
        while ((coproc |& getline) > 0)
            print
        close(coproc)
    }
'
share|improve this answer
    
Please see update to question. –  toop Apr 13 '12 at 9:53

Pure Bash:

declare -a count

while read ; do
  cnt=${REPLY//[^p]/}               # remove non-p characters
  ((count[${#cnt}]++))              # use length as array index
done < "$infile"

for idx in ${!count[*]}             # iterate over existing indices
do echo -e "$idx ${count[idx]}"
done | sort -nr

Output as desired:

4 1
3 2
0 2
share|improve this answer
    
I added sort, to get the desired output. Hope that's fine with you. btw to get "occs" "cnt" and correctly formatted output (tabs between columns) just use printf -- "%d\t%d\n" "$idx" "${count[idx]}" –  c00kiemon5ter Apr 12 '12 at 13:32
    
Please see update to question. –  toop Apr 13 '12 at 9:53
$ sed 's/[^p]//g' input.txt | awk '{print length}' | sort -nr | uniq -c | awk 'BEGIN{print "occs", "count"}{print $2,$1}' | column -t
occs  count
4     1
3     2
0     2
share|improve this answer
    
Couldn't it start off sed 's/[^p]//g' input.txt? –  gpojd Apr 12 '12 at 13:09
    
@gpojd Thanks for your advice. –  kev Apr 12 '12 at 13:12
    
Please see update to question. –  toop Apr 13 '12 at 9:53

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