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I have a multi-modules project, like this one:

main-project/
    module1/
    module2/
        sub-module1/
        sub-module2/
        sub-module3/
        ...
    module3/
    module4/
    ...

I need to define a set of properties (that are dependent of the environment on which I want to release my project) in Maven2. I will not use <properties> as there is lots of properties... Thus, I use the Properties Maven2 plugin.

The properties files are located in the main-project/ directory. How can I set the correct directory in the main pom.xml, in order to specify to any children where to find the properties file?

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
    <artifactId>properties-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-alpha-1</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>read-project-properties</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <files>
                    <file>???/env_${env}.properties</file>
                </files>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

If I set only <file>env_${env}.properties</file>, then when Maven2 compiles the first module, it will not find the main-project/env_dev.properties file. If I set <file>../env_${env}.properties</file>, then an error will be raised at the parent level, or at any sub-module level...

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12 Answers 12

up vote 68 down vote accepted

Try setting a property in each pom to find the main project directory.

In the parent:

<properties>
    <main.basedir>${project.basedir}</main.basedir>
</properties>

In the children:

<properties>
    <main.basedir>${project.parent.basedir}</main.basedir>
</properties>

In the grandchildren:

<properties>
    <main.basedir>${project.parent.parent.basedir}</main.basedir>
</properties>
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11  
Were these pre-set properties removed? ${parent.basedir} no longer parses into anything in 3.0.4... –  matt5784 Jul 12 '12 at 0:14
3  
Yeah, this doesn't work. ${project.parent.basedir} evaluates to null. –  Jared Aug 29 '12 at 16:20
2  
well shoot. is there a solution that works in 3.0.4 and later? –  emmby Dec 22 '12 at 0:28
4  
I've had success with ${project.basedir}/.. but that really only works in multi-module projects that are in a strict directory hierarchy. –  Jonathan Feb 26 '13 at 15:44
13  
Sigh. Unbelievable, that Maven makes this so hard. –  Stefan Haberl Apr 17 '13 at 7:38

I've found a solution to solve my problem: I search the properties files using the Groovy Maven plugin.

As my properties file is necessarily in current directory, in ../ or in ../.., I wrote a small Groovy code that checks these three folders.

Here is the extract of my pom.xml:

<!-- Use Groovy to search the location of the properties file. -->
<plugin>
    <groupId>org.codehaus.groovy.maven</groupId>
    <artifactId>gmaven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-rc-5</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <phase>validate</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>execute</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <source>
                    import java.io.File;
                    String p = project.properties['env-properties-file'];
                    File f = new File(p); 
                    if (!f.exists()) {
                        f = new File("../" + p);
                        if (!f.exists()) {
                            f = new File("../../" + p);
                        }
                    }
                    project.properties['env-properties-file-by-groovy'] = f.getAbsolutePath();
            </source>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>
<!-- Now, I can load the properties file using the new 'env-properties-file-by-groovy' property. -->
<plugin>
    <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
    <artifactId>properties-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-alpha-1</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>read-project-properties</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <files>
                    <file>${env-properties-file-by-groovy}</file>
                </files>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

This is working, but I don't really like it.

So, if you have a better solution, do not hesitate to post!

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In my case it works like this:

...
<properties>
  <main_dir>${project.parent.relativePath}/..</main_dir>
</properties>
...

<plugin>
        <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
        <artifactId>properties-maven-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>1.0-alpha-1</version>
        <executions>
          <execution>
            <phase>initialize</phase>
            <goals>
              <goal>read-project-properties</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
              <files>
                 <file>${main_dir}/maven_custom.properties</file>
              </files>
            </configuration>
          </execution>
        </executions>
</plugin>
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So the problem as I see it is that you can't get the absolute path to a parent directory in maven.

<rant> I've heard this talked about as an anti-pattern, but for every anti-pattern there is real, legitimate use case for it, and I'm sick of maven telling me I can only follow their patterns.</rant>

So the work around I found was to use antrun. Try this in the child pom.xml:

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-antrun-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.7</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>getMainBaseDir</id>
            <phase>validate</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>run</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <exportAntProperties>true</exportAntProperties>
                <target>
                    <!--Adjust the location below to your directory structure -->
                    <property name="main.basedir" location="./.." />
                    <echo message="main.basedir=${main.basedir}"/>
                </target>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

If you run mvn verify you should see something like this:

main:
     [echo] main.basedir=C:\src\parent.project.dir.name

You can then use ${main.basedir} in any of the other plugins, etc. Took me a while to figure this out, so hope it helps someone else.

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You are in project C, project C is submodule of B and B is submodule of A. You try to reach module D's src/test/config/etc directory from project C. D is also submodule of A. The following expression makes this possible to get the URI path:

-Dparameter=file:/${basedir}/../../D/src/test/config/etc
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<plugins>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>org.codehaus.groovy.maven</groupId>
    <artifactId>gmaven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <executions>
      <execution>
        <phase>validate</phase>
        <goals>
          <goal>execute</goal>
        </goals>
        <configuration>
          <source>
            import java.io.File
            project.properties.parentdir = "${pom.basedir}"
            while (new File(new File(project.properties.parentdir).parent, 'pom.xml').exists()) {
                project.properties.parentdir = new File(project.properties.parentdir).parent
            }
          </source>
        </configuration>
      </execution>
    </executions>
  </plugin>
  <plugin>
    <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
    <artifactId>properties-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-alpha-2</version>
    <executions>
      <execution>
        <phase>initialize</phase>
        <goals>
          <goal>read-project-properties</goal>
        </goals>
        <configuration>
          <files>
            <file>${parentdir}/build.properties</file>
          </files>
        </configuration>
      </execution>
    </executions>
  </plugin>
  ...
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I've found a solution to solve this problem: use ${parent.relativePath}

<parent>
    <artifactId>xxx</artifactId>
    <groupId>xxx</groupId>
    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <relativePath>..</relativePath>
</parent>
<build>
    <filters>
        <filter>${parent.relativePath}/src/main/filters/filter-${env}.properties</filter>
    </filters>
    <resources>
        <resource>
            <directory>src/main/resources</directory>
            <filtering>true</filtering>
        </resource>
    </resources>
</build>
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1  
This may not always be safe; ${parent.relativePath} can include a filename, e.g. "../pom.xml" –  pimlottc Dec 4 '12 at 23:43

The following small profile worked for me. I needed such a configuration for CheckStyle, which I put into the config directory in the root of the project, so I can run it from the main module and from submodules.

<profile>
    <id>root-dir</id>
    <activation>
        <file>
            <exists>${project.basedir}/../../config/checkstyle.xml</exists>
        </file>
    </activation>
    <properties>
        <project.config.path>${project.basedir}/../config</project.config.path>
    </properties>
</profile>

It won't work for nested modules, but I'm sure it can be modified for that using several profiles with different exists's. (I have no idea why there should be "../.." in the verification tag and just ".." in the overriden property itself, but it works only in that way.)

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In an answer to another question I showed how the maven-properties-plugin could be extended to use external property descriptors defined in Maven dependencies.

You could extend that idea to have multiple descriptor jars, each with the environment name as part of the artifactId, containing a ${env}.properties. Then you can use the property to select the appropriate jar and properties file, for example:

<plugin>
  <groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
  <artifactId>properties-ext-maven-plugin</artifactId>
  <version>0.0.1</version>
  <executions>
    <execution>
      <id>read-properties</id>
      <phase>initialize</phase>
      <goals>
        <goal>read-project-properties</goal>
      </goals>
    </execution>
  </executions>                              
  <configuration>
    <filePaths>
      <!--assume the descriptor project has a file in the root of the jar -->
      <filePath>${env}.properties</filePath>
    </filePaths>
  </configuration> 
  <dependencies>
    <!-- reference the properties jar for the particular environment-->
    <dependency>
      <groupId>some.descriptor.group</groupId>
      <artifactId>env-${env}-descriptor</artifactId>
      <version>0.0.1</version>
    </dependency>
  </dependencies>
</plugin>
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I just improve the groovy script from above to write the property in the root parent properties file:

import java.io.*;
String p = project.properties['env-properties-file']
File f = new File(p)
if (f.exists()) {
try{
FileWriter fstream = new FileWriter(f.getAbsolutePath())
BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(fstream)
String propToSet = f.getAbsolutePath().substring(0, f.getAbsolutePath().lastIndexOf(File.separator))
if (File.separator != "/") {
propToSet = propToSet.replace(File.separator,File.separator+File.separator+File.separator)
}
out.write("jacoco.agent = " + propToSet + "/lib/jacocoagent.jar")
out.close()
}catch (Exception e){
}
}
String ret = "../"
while (!f.exists()) {
f = new File(ret + p)
ret+= "../"
}
project.properties['env-properties-file-by-groovy'] = f.getAbsolutePath()
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Did you try ../../env_${env}.properties ?

Normally we do the following when module2 is on the same level as the sub-modules

<modules>
    <module>../sub-module1</module>
    <module>../sub-module2</module>
    <module>../sub-module3</module>
</modules>

I would think the ../.. would let you jump up two levels. If not, you might want to contact the plug in authors and see if this is a known issue.

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If I put ../../env.props in the main pom.xml, then I will get an error when Maven2 will try to build the main pom, and all moduleX. This configuration will in fact works only for all sub-modules... –  romaintaz Jun 19 '09 at 6:10

I think that if you use the extension pattern used in the example for findbugs plugin & multimodule you may be able to set global properties related to absolute paths. It uses a top

example for multi module

The top level pom has an unrelated build-config project and a app-parent for the modules of the multimodule project. The app-parent uses extension to link itself to the build-config project and obtain resources from it. This is used to carry common config files to the modules. It may be a conduit for properties as well. You could write the top dir to a property file consumed by the build-config. (it seems too complex)

The problem is that a new top level must be added to the multi-module project to make this work. I tried to side step with a truly unrelated build-config project but it was kludgy and seemed brittle.

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