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For a assignment I need to extract certain information from files (in java), the text in the files goes similar to this :

OFFICE_MANAGEMENT =     Higher ManagementCONSTRUCTION = SupervisorCONTRACT_MANAGEMENT = Contract ManagerPROJECT =   Project ManagerLOCATION = User Specified LocationDEPARTMENT = Local.........    

I need to extract each of the specific items

I have little or no experience with in regex but I tried.

If I use something like

OFFICE_MANAGEMENT =\s*([a-z A-Z]*)\s*   

I get

Higher ManagementCONSTRUCTION 

as result. I may not alter the text :(

How can I make sure he takes everyting until the next item. I was thinking that he needs to read everything until the next word with more then one Captital letter but I have no idea how to do this.

So any help or suggestions will be more then welcome

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no line breaks? –  Matten Apr 12 '12 at 13:05
    
Before trying to write an answer to you... What delimits the key-value pair (or "item" with your terminology)? Where does a new key "start"? What defines an "item"? –  Hauns TM Apr 12 '12 at 13:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming that the keys are all-uppercase (plus possibly underscores):

List<String> matchList = new ArrayList<String>();
Pattern regex = Pattern.compile(
    "([\\p{Lu}_]+)  # one or more characters, all caps and underscores\n" +
    "\\s*=\\s*      # equals sign, possibly surrounded by whitespace\n" +
    "([^=]+)        # any letters except equals sign\n" +
    "(?<=\\p{Ll})   # but only until the last lowercase letter", 
    Pattern.COMMENTS);
Matcher regexMatcher = regex.matcher(subjectString);
while (regexMatcher.find()) {
    matchList.add(regexMatcher.group());
} 

separates your string into

OFFICE_MANAGEMENT =     Higher Management
CONSTRUCTION = Supervisor
CONTRACT_MANAGEMENT = Contract Manager
PROJECT =   Project Manager
LOCATION = User Specified Location
DEPARTMENT = Local

(and for each match, regexMatcher.group(1) contains the title and regexMatcher.group(2) contains the description.)

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awsome. Thank you for the regex and for documenting each part –  Darth Blue Ray Apr 12 '12 at 13:38
    
Is there a way to make this generic in java (regex)? I mean to make the first part (before the =) generic so I'm able to extract something specific (that I give along when I call), so I can reuse the code over and over? –  Darth Blue Ray Apr 12 '12 at 13:46
    
@DarthBlueRay: I think so - what do you mean by generic? Do you have some examples? –  Tim Pietzcker Apr 12 '12 at 15:42
    
Lets say I just need to find just one of them and in the given file all of them are there but not each time in the same order. So I could adjust the regex before the = with the specific item name : e.g. PROJECT =\s*([^=]+)(?<=\p{Ll}) would just give the value for PROJECT. I could make this reusable when I adjust the regex each time for the item I need. –  Darth Blue Ray Apr 12 '12 at 19:38

Try something like

[A-Z_]+\s*=\s*(?:\s?[A-Z][a-z]+)+

See it here on Regexr

This will match a word consisting of uppercase and underscore before the = and one or more words after the equal sign that starts with an uppercase and have then lowercase following.

And here the Java Unicode version:

String text = "OFFICE_MANAGEMENT =     Higher ManagementCONSTRUCTION = SupervisorCONTRACT_MANAGEMENT = Contract ManagerPROJECT =   Project ManagerLOCATION = User Specified LocationDEPARTMENT = Local";

Pattern p = Pattern
            .compile("[\\p{Lu}\\p{Pc}]+\\s*=\\s*(?:\\s?\\p{Lu}\\p{Ll}+)+");
Matcher m = p.matcher(text);
while(m.find()){
    System.out.println(m.group(0));
}

\\p{Lu} a Unicode code point with the property uppercase letter

\\p{Ll} a Unicode code point with the property lowercase letter

\\p{Pc} a punctuation character such as an underscore that connects words

See here for more details about Unicode code properties.

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