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map<string, string> dada;
dada["dummy"] = "papy";
cout << dada["pootoo"];

I'm puzzled because I don't know if it's considered undefined behaviour or not, how to know when I request a key which does not exist, do I just use find instead ?

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Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/5087091/… –  Eric Z Apr 12 '12 at 13:43
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The map::operator[] searches the data structure for a value corresponding to the given key, and returns a reference to it.

If it can't find one it transparently creates a default constructed element for it. (If you do not want this behaviour you can use the map::at function instead.)

You can get a full list of methods of std::map here:

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/map

Here is the documentation of map::operator[] from the current C++ standard...

23.4.4.3 Map Element Access

T& operator[](const key_type& x);

  1. Effects: If there is no key equivalent to x in the map, inserts value_type(x, T()) into the map.

  2. Requires: key_type shall be CopyConstructible and mapped_type shall be DefaultConstructible.

  3. Returns: A reference to the mapped_type corresponding to x in *this.

  4. Complexity: logarithmic.

T& operator[](key_type&& x);

  1. Effects: If there is no key equivalent to x in the map, inserts value_type(std::move(x), T()) into the map.

  2. Requires: mapped_type shall be DefaultConstructible.

  3. Returns: A reference to the mapped_type corresponding to x in *this.

  4. Complexity: logarithmic.

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I actually did not find anywhere in the standard that it says that. At the very least, not at 23.3.1.2 [lib.map.access] or anywhere else that I could remember to check. EDIT: Apparently I was looking at an old version of the standard. My mistake. –  Vlad Ciobanu Apr 12 '12 at 13:41
    
@VladCiobanu: Above is 23.4.4.3 copied verbatim. Are you using the current version ISO/IEC 14882:2011(E)? –  Andrew Tomazos Apr 12 '12 at 13:44
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It's not undefined behavior. If operator [] doesn't find a value for the provided key, it inserts one at that position.

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For operator[], if you try to access a value for a key that doesn't exist, a new value object that has been default constructed will be put into the map and it's reference returned.

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The operator[] for map returns a non-const reference and you can assign using that in the way you've shown on your second line. Accessing in this way will create a default contructed element of value type.

If you want to find a find an element, a better way is

iterator find ( const key_type& x )

(or the const alternative) which will return an iterator equal to <map>.end() if it doesn't find the key, or if you just want to know if it's in the collection you can use

size_type count ( const key_type& x ) const

which will always return either 1 or 0 for a map since keys are unique.

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please have a look at the out_of_range exception: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/stdexcept/out_of_range/

this is what map::at and map::operator[] will throw if key does not exist. You can catch it the same way as the vector example in the link.

You can also use: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/map/map/find/

And check against map::end

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