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One of the FTP accounts that I use recently began requiring secure FTP connections, which broke a script that I used to upload to it using a 'standard' FTP library. I've written a little batch file that will upload the 2 files via FTPS.exe (MoveIT Freely), but I get a dialog box that pops up and requires me to click yes.

Normally this wouldn't be a problem, but I'm calling the batch file at the end of a ~10 minute long script that parses, combines, and encodes several CSV files (usually unattended). With this dialog box popping up, I have to keep an eye on it... I'm trying to get this to the point where I can run it as a scheduled task and forget about it.

There doesn't seem to be much support for this freeware unless you are also a payware customer, so I was wondering if anyone else has run into this problem and knows a flag to ignore the error (or a workaround, or another free secure FTP solution). Error is below (server names changed).

MOVEit Freely

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Non trusted certificate
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The certificate's CN name does not match the passed value.

Certificate issued to: funftp501

Certificate issued by: Standalone007



Do you want to proceed with the connection?
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Yes   No   
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you are sure that you use the proper servername in your script (meaning: the exact name that the certificate was issued to), then you could try using the parameter '-natpasv'.

You can also use '-z' to skip warnings...

Hope this helps

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This (-z parameter) worked perfectly. Thanks! –  user156662 Aug 26 '09 at 20:12
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I was involved in creating MOVEit Freely. You may also want to try just running the client like this:

ftps -?

...to dump the short help. But "JW" is right. The "-z to not warn about problems with certificates" option was what we created to avoid this exact situation. As long as the certificate isn't expired (I don't think we let that one go), the "-z" argument will eat all other errors.

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