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I get this message for line 84 and line 85 (the two, stacked using lines):

CA2000 : Microsoft.Reliability : In method 'RavenDataAccess.GetRavenDatabase()', object '<>g_initLocal9' is not disposed along all exception paths. Call System.IDisposable.Dispose on object '<>g_initLocal9' before all references to it are out of scope.

DocumentStore implements IDisposable.

Why? How else can I dispose the DocumentStore objects? They're created in a using block, and I dispose of them in my catch block. How should this be fixed?

private static IDocumentStore GetRavenDatabase()
{
    Shards shards = new Shards();

    try
    {
        using (DocumentStore docStore1 = new DocumentStore { Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard1"] })  // Line 84
        using (DocumentStore docStore2 = new DocumentStore { Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard2"] })  // Line 85
        {
            shards.Add(docStore1);
            shards.Add(docStore2);
        }

        using (ShardedDocumentStore documentStore = new ShardedDocumentStore(new ShardStrategy(), shards))
        {
            documentStore.Initialize();

            IndexCreation.CreateIndexes(typeof(RavenDataAccess).Assembly, documentStore);

            return documentStore;
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        shards.ForEach(docStore => docStore.Dispose());

        throw;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
check it out, maybe it's the same stuff you have: stackoverflow.com/questions/3932131/… –  cookieMonster Apr 12 '12 at 14:03
    
That link is interesting. I'm calling Add() on Shards, but it doesn't implement ICollection. And since Shards is not my code, I can't change it. This is the Shards signature: public class Shards : List<IDocumentStore> –  Bob Horn Apr 12 '12 at 14:16
    
Ok, do you have a chance to Implement one more? –  cookieMonster Apr 12 '12 at 14:20
    
Sorry, I don't follow what you mean. –  Bob Horn Apr 12 '12 at 14:26
    
Sorry, i'm getting a bit silly at the end of the day - didn't notice you cannot change it. So, you may just suppress warning message of that method. –  cookieMonster Apr 12 '12 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to ensure that you dispose all your newly created Disposable objects along any possible exception path. See below:

private static IDocumentStore GetRavenDatabase()
{
    Shards shards = new Shards();
    DocumentStore docStore1 = null;
    DocumentStore docStore2 = null;

    ShardedDocumentStore shardedDocumentStore = null;
    ShardedDocumentStore tempShardedDocumentStore = null;

    try
    {
        docStore1 = new DocumentStore();
        docStore1.Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard1"];
        docStore2 = new DocumentStore();
        docStore2.Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard2"];

        shards.Add(docStore1);
        shards.Add(docStore2);

        tempShardedDocumentStore = new ShardedDocumentStore(new ShardStrategy(), shards);
        tempShardedDocumentStore.Initialize();

        IndexCreation.CreateIndexes(typeof(RavenDataAccess).Assembly, tempShardedDocumentStore);

        docStore1 = null;
        docStore2 = null;

        shardedDocumentStore = tempShardedDocumentStore;
        tempShardedDocumentStore = null;

        return shardedDocumentStore;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (tempShardedDocumentStore != null) { tempShardedDocumentStore.Dispose(); }
        if (docStore1 != null) { docStore1.Dispose(); }
        if (docStore2 != null) { docStore2.Dispose(); }
    }
}

CA seems to have a problem with the inline property initializers but if you break them out this should work. Key thing is to ensure that no matter where an exception is thrown in the try block, all your new objects that can be disposed are cleaned up.

By setting the temp references you no longer need to null (docStore1, docStore2, and tempShardedDocumentStore) just prior to returning, you can check in the finally block to see if they in fact were set to null, if not, an exception occurred somewhere and you can dispose of them before execution leaves this method.

Note docStore1 and docStore2 are temporary references as they are added to the Shards collection.

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1  
This worked! Wow, what a pain for something seemingly so simple. Thanks, Jim! –  Bob Horn Apr 12 '12 at 15:44
    
@Bob - Trying to adhere to CA can be a pain but it is for a good reason :-) Now if only the compiler helped us out by making all this automatic, then we wouldn't have to write all this extra code. –  Jim Apr 12 '12 at 15:47
    
The docStores will (probably) be disposed twice if tempSharededDocumentStore.Initialize() throws. But that might be ok. –  Torbjörn Kalin Apr 13 '12 at 6:07

First of all, the shards you pass into new ShardedDocumentStore() contains disposed docStore1 and docStore2. This will most likely cause problems.

Also, in the catch statement you dispose the docStores that might already be disposed.

Finally, the ShardedDocumentStore that you returned is being disposed (by using) when you return it, probably making it unusable for the caller.

Also, I had a quick look at the ShardedDocumentStore (at GitHub) and I'd say that it takes care of the disposal of its docStores. That is, you shouldn't handle it.

Change your code to this:

private static IDocumentStore GetRavenDatabase()
{
    ShardedDocumentStore documentStore = null;
    var docStore1 = null;
    var docStore2 = null;

    try
    {
        Shards shards = new Shards();
        docStore1 = new DocumentStore { Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard1"] };
        shards.Add(docStore1);
        docStore2 = new DocumentStore { Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard2"] };
        shards.Add(docStore2);

        documentStore = new ShardedDocumentStore(new ShardStrategy(), shards);
        documentStore.Initialize();

        IndexCreation.CreateIndexes(typeof(RavenDataAccess).Assembly, documentStore);

        return documentStore;
    }
    catch
    {
        if (documentStore != null)
        {
            documentStore.Dispose();
        }
        else
        {
            if (docStore2 != null) docStore2.Dispose();
            if (docStore1 != null) docStore1.Dispose();
        }
        throw;
    }
}

...and let the caller of GetRavenDatabase() handle disposal of the returned IDocumentStore.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that and now I get three violations (the two new DocumentStore lines, and the new ShardedDocumentStore line). I'd let the caller worry about disposal, but the caller is a static property on a static class: private static IDocumentStore _ravenDatabase = GetRavenDatabase(); –  Bob Horn Apr 12 '12 at 14:23
    
and also why compiler notes it on lines 84,85 ?... –  Tigran Apr 12 '12 at 14:27
    
I updated the code to handle exceptions. However, I wonder if the compiler can really cover all flows. I would say the ravendb API is quite crappy and it might be impossible to write code using it that doesn't raise this warning. Perhaps you need to disable the warning for this code? And regarding the static field, I think you need to find a different solution for that. –  Torbjörn Kalin Apr 12 '12 at 14:34
    
If an exception occurs in Shards.Add, one cannot expect Shards.Dispose to take care of the DocumentStore that may or may not have been added. If DocumentStore properly implements IDisposable.Dispose, it should be safe to, in case of exception, call Dispose on any instances you've created after you call Shards.Dispose. On the other hand, I'd suggest using an ok flag along with a try/finally block. If the finally block for your routine executes without ok being set, dispose the Shards and DocumentStore objects you've created. –  supercat Apr 12 '12 at 14:45
    
@supercat true, I updated the code. Looks worse than ever. –  Torbjörn Kalin Apr 12 '12 at 15:03

Here's why object initializers in a using statement result in the CA warning:

Your code that looks like this:

using (DocumentStore docStore2 = new DocumentStore { Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard2"] })  // Line 85
{
   ...
}

... essentialy becomes this, due to the way object initializers work:

DocumentStore foo = new DocumentStore;
foo.Url = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["RavenShard2"];
using(DocumentStore docStore2 = foo)
{
   ...
}

So as you can see, the initialization of the DocumentStore now happens outside of the using{} block, so if the line that sets temp.Url throws an exception, your DocumentStore will not be disposed.

There are a number of workarounds, such as passing the parameters in to the object's constructor, setting the properties inside of the using statement instead of using object initializers, or using try/finally blocks.

share|improve this answer
    
This is good insight on the property initializer however in this example, Bob shouldn't use "using" statements on objects he plans to return to the caller. By using the "using" statements, his new objects will be disposed before they are returned and thus not usable by the caller of this method. –  Jim Apr 12 '12 at 16:22
    
Yup, great point.. I totally missed that part of the code. –  Marty Dill Apr 12 '12 at 16:32
    
Thanks for the tip +1. Helped me understand why it was happening in my project. –  James Fleming Apr 20 '13 at 12:36

Considering that CA2000: Dispose objects before losing scope documentation states (part from it):

Nesting constructors that are protected only by one exception handler. For example:

using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(new FileStream("C:\myfile.txt", FileMode.Create))) { ... }

causes CA2000 to occur because a failure in the construction of the StreamReader object can result in the FileStream object never being closed.

and considering that I don't see in the code provided any disposable object allocation other then DocumentStore itself, I would suppose that this is a bug of compiler.

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