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Can anyone explain why the following happens in R:

> 0.0 < "14.9a"
[1] TRUE

> 2.03 < "14.9a"
[1] FALSE

> 10.11006 < "14.9a"
[1] TRUE

what happens when "14.9a" is coerced internally to an int? It can't just be ignoring non-numeric characters as the 2nd example shows.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think it's doing the opposite and converting the int to a string.

> "0.0" < "14.9a"
[1] TRUE

> "2.03" < "14.9a"
[1] FALSE

> "10.11006" < "14.9a"
[1] TRUE

From the help page:

If the two arguments are atomic vectors of different types, one is coerced to the type of the other, the (decreasing) order of precedence being character, complex, numeric, integer, logical and raw.

and also:

Comparison of strings in character vectors is lexicographic within the strings using the collating sequence of the locale in use: see locales. The collating sequence of locales such as en_US is normally different from C (which should use ASCII) and can be surprising. Beware of making any assumptions about the collation order ...

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1  
Correct, but note that the first case is "0" < "14.9a", not "0.0". It's pretty much the result of as.character(0.0). –  Tommy Apr 12 '12 at 15:55

As per ?"<":

If the two arguments are atomic vectors of different types, one is coerced to the type of the other, the (decreasing) order of precedence being character, complex, numeric, integer, logical and raw.

The numeric values are therefore converted to strings, and the strings are then compared according to their lexicographic order. (I.e., "2" > "10")

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