Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Write a class encapsulating the concept of a circle, assuming a circle has the following attributes: a Point representing the center of the circle, and the radius of the circle, an integer. Include a constructor, the accessors and mutators, and methods toString and equals. Also include methods returning the perimeter (2*PI*radius) and area (PI*radius^2) of the circle.

import java.awt.*;


public class Circle {

    private int radius;

    public Circle() {

        radius = 1;
    }

    public Circle(int x, int y, int r) {
        super(x, y, c);
        radius = r;
    }

    public int getRadius() {
        return radius;
    }

    public double getArea() {
        return Math.PI * radius * radius;
    }

    public double getPerimeter() {
        return 2 * Math.PI * radius;
    }
}

I could get this far, I'm just a little confused on the adding the point constructor, accessor and mutator to my class.

Would it look something like this?

  protected int x, y;

  public point() {

      setPoint(0,0);

  }

  public point(int coordx, int coordy) {
      setPoint(coordx,coordy);
  }

  public void setPoint(int coordx, int coordy) {
      x = coordx;
      y = coordy;
  }
  public int getX() {
      return x;
  }

  public int getY() {
      return y;
  }

  public String toPrint() {
      return "[" + x + "," + y + "]";
  }

  }

Is it possible to combine the both in 1 Class? I tried it and every line in it had an error saying Circle had no return type. Any insight would be a returnable favor. Thanks again guys.

share|improve this question
    
a circle has the following attributes: a Point representing the center of the circle, and the radius of the circle, an integer. So where is the Point declaration in Circle class?? –  sarwar026 Apr 12 '12 at 14:56
    
If I recall correctly a Point can be seen as a superclass of a circle with radius fixed to zero. Thus I'd write a Point class and then derive a Circle class. –  BigMike Apr 12 '12 at 14:58
    
@BigMike if Point is superclass for Circle, does it have radius? IMHO no. I think there is too few common things between the two to create relation like "Point is circle with zero length radius"... –  Betlista Apr 12 '12 at 15:04
    
What is a superclass/superconstructor? –  user1316703 Apr 12 '12 at 15:05
    
@Betlista sorry for my bad english. of course a point has no radius, the circle extends that by adding it. In code is easier to describe than in english for me. –  BigMike Apr 12 '12 at 15:05

4 Answers 4

You're talking about having constructors for multiple objects in a single class. That can't be done. Java thinks that public point() is a method that doesn't have a return type and so is syntactically incorrect.

You don't need to make a class for point. Java provides java.awt.Point already. Just add a class level field for Point to your Circle class and you're good.

Circle would then look something like this:

public class Circle {

    private int radius;
    private Point point;

    public Circle() {
        point = new Point(0, 0);
        radius = 1;
    }

    public Circle(int x, int y, int r) {
        point = new Point(x, y);
        radius = r;
    }

    public int getRadius() {
        return radius;
    }

    public double getArea() {
        return Math.PI * radius * radius;
    }

    public double getPerimeter() {
        return 2 * Math.PI * radius;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah gotcha. So one class. So how does one set a (0,0) point in my Circle class? I've never come across something like this unless I was using a GUI and drawing a circle. –  user1316703 Apr 12 '12 at 15:01
    
I just edited my answer to show you how do that. –  Tim Pote Apr 12 '12 at 15:05
    
Oh wow thats it? Thank you. –  user1316703 Apr 12 '12 at 15:09
    
Actually, a better way to do it would be too call this(0, 0, 1); from the default constructor Circle(). That would be more in line with OOP, but this is pretty trivial example and my point was to show you how to set fields. –  Tim Pote Apr 12 '12 at 15:16

Here some code, a Circle is an extension of a point adding a radius to it

public class Point {
   public Point(int x, int y) {
      // .. set x and Y coord
   }

   // Getters and Setters
   public int getX() {
      return x;
   }

  public int getY() {
      return y;
  }

  public String toPrint() {
      return "[" + x + "," + y + "]";
  }
  // Your other Point methods...


  private int x = 0;
  private int y = 0;
}


public class Circle extends Point {
  int rad;

  public Circle (int x, int y, int radius) {
    super(x, y);
    rad = radius;
  }
  // Your other Circle methods
}

As promised: another way with no extension could be:

class Point {
  int x;
  int y;

  public Point (int x, int y) {
     this.x = x;
     this.y = y;
  }
  // Getter/Setters and other methods
}


public class Circle {

  Point centre = null;
  int radius = 0;

  public Circle(int x, int y, int rad) {
      centre = new Point(x, y);
      radius = rad;
  }
   // Your other Circle methods
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah that makes much more sense. Thank you. Call Point from Circle, and carry onward like that. I appreciate it a mil. –  user1316703 Apr 12 '12 at 15:04
    
@user1316703 Beware, the very same can be achieved having a Cirlce class with a simple Point data member. Both ways are probably good. Will add also the other way. –  BigMike Apr 12 '12 at 15:06
1  
No - circle is not a point - therefore it should not extend the point class. Use composition instead –  scibuff Apr 12 '12 at 15:10
    
@scibuff both ways are equally valid to me, extending a class can be done also not for the sake of good oop design, but just to avoid code rewrite. Btw, my Geometry studies lies far far away in time, but I'm almost sure that there's a sort of relation between a point and a circle. –  BigMike Apr 12 '12 at 15:12
    
You don't need to rewrite anything, just use the Point class inside the Circle class (see my example below). p.s. there definitely is no relation between a point and a circle (apart from that a circle is a set of "points" equidistant from a given center) –  scibuff Apr 12 '12 at 15:15

You call super constructor inside constructor:

super(x, y, c); 
share|improve this answer

I'd do it this way

import java.awt.Point;

public class Circle {

    private Point center;
    private int radius;

    public Circle(){
        this( new Point( 0, 0 ) );
    }

    public Circle( int x, int y, int radius ){
        this( new Point( x, y ), radius );
    }

    public Circle( Point center ){
        this( center, 1 );
    }

    public Circle( Point center, int radius ){   
        this.setCenter( center );
        this.radius = radius;
    }

    public int getRadius(){ return this.radius; }
    public Point getCenter(){ return this.center; }

    public double getPerimeter(){ return 2 * Math.PI * this.radius; }
    public double getArea(){ return Math.PI * this.radius * this.radius; }

    public void setCenter( int x, int y ){
        this.setCenter( new Point( x, y ) );
    } 

    public void setCenter( Point center ){
        this.center = center;
    }

    public boolean equals( Object o ){ 

        if ( o == this ){ return true; }
        if ( o == null || o.getClass() != this.getClass() ){ return false; }

        Circle c = (Circle) o;
        return ( o.radius == this.radius && o.center.equals( this.center ) );
    }

    public string toString(){
        return "Circle[" + this.center.toString() + ", " + this.radius + "]";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Mind=blown. This is a little difficult for me to interpret haha. I think I get what youre trying to show me though. –  user1316703 Apr 12 '12 at 15:13
    
there isn't much to it ... the code above uses method overloading - the correct constructor will be called based on the supplied arguments - the advantage is that it minimizes code duplication, i.e. the relevant init code is in one of the constructors and the others call it. –  scibuff Apr 12 '12 at 15:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.