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I'm trying to use CSV to calculate the average of three numbers and output it to a separate file. Particularly, open one file, take the first value (name), and then calculate the average of the next three values. Do this multiple times for each person in the file.

Here is my Book1.csv

Tom,90,80,70
Adam,80,85,83
Mike,100,93,89
Dave,100,100,100
Rob,80,70,75
Nick,80,90,70
Justin,100,90,90
Jen,80,90,100

I'm trying to get it to output this:

Tom,80
Adam,83
Mike,94
Dave,100
Rob,75
Nick,80
Justin,93
Jen,90

I have each person in an array and I could get this to work with the basic "pseudo" code I have written, but it does not work. Here is my code so far:

#!/usr/bin/ruby
require 'csv'
names=[]
grades1=[]
grades2=[]
grades3=[]
average=[]
i = 0
CSV.foreach('Book1.csv') do |students|
  names << students.values_at(0)
  grades1 << reader.values_at(1)
  grades2 << reader.values_at(2)
  grades3 << reader.values_at(3)
end

while i<10 do
   average[i]= grades1[i] + grades2[i] + grades3[i]
   i= i + 1
end

CSV.open('Book2.csv', 'w') do |writer|
   rows.each { |record| writer << record }
end

The while loop part is the part that I am most concerned with. Any insight?

share|improve this question
    
An example of your CSV file is pretty important. –  Phrogz Apr 12 '12 at 15:22
1  
That's a lot of extra work--seems like it could all be done in a single loop, and without all the intermediate arrays. –  Dave Newton Apr 12 '12 at 15:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have an array of values that you want to sum, you can use:

sum = array.inject(:+)

If you change your data structure to:

grades = [ [], [], [] ]
...
grades[0] << reader.values_at(1)

Then you can do:

0.upto(9) do |i|
  average[i] = (0..2).map{ |n| grades[n][i] }.inject(:+) / 3
end

There are a variety of ways to improve your data structures, the above being one of the least impactful to your code.

Any time you find yourself writing:

foo1 = ...
foo2 = ...

You should recognize it as code smell, and think of how you could organize your data in better collections.


Here's a rewrite of how I might do this. Notice that it works for any number of scores, not hardcoded to 3:

require 'csv'
averages = CSV.parse(DATA.read).map do |row|
  name, *grades = *row
  [ name, grades.map(&:to_i).inject(:+) / grades.length ]
end
puts averages.map(&:to_csv)
#=> Tom,80
#=> Adam,82
#=> Mike,94
#=> Dave,100
#=> Rob,75
#=> Nick,80
#=> Justin,93
#=> Jen,90

__END__
Tom,90,80,70
Adam,80,85,83
Mike,100,93,89
Dave,100,100,100
Rob,80,70,75
Nick,80,90,70
Justin,100,90,90
Jen,80,90,100
share|improve this answer
    
I've edited my answer to use your data, and to create the nearest integer average (instead of using floating point division) since that's what you said you want. –  Phrogz Apr 12 '12 at 15:36
    
My question here is how would I implement this to access Book1.csv? –  Brad Kaufman Apr 12 '12 at 15:48
    
See the docs for CSV for how to create an array from a file (hint: see read). But in general the important thing in my answer is how to convert one row of grades into a row with the average; there are many ways to use this to convert one entire file into another. –  Phrogz Apr 12 '12 at 16:00

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