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When a SocketException is encountered (or an IOException when your using BufferedReader for the socket) at all, should the whole connection be considered bad?

I'm more or less wondering if there are any "non-fatal" exceptions that can occur when reading or writing to a socket, Exceptions that occur but the socket is still usable.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A compilation of the javadoc of the subclasses of SocketException shows that you can't recover from such an exception and reuse the socket.

  • BindException Signals that an error occurred while attempting to bind a socket to a local address and port. Typically, the port is in use, or the requested local address could not be assigned.

  • ConnectException Signals that an error occurred while attempting to connect a socket to a remote address and port. Typically, the connection was refused remotely (e.g., no process is listening on the remote address/port).

  • NoRouteToHostException Signals that an error occurred while attempting to connect a socket to a remote address and port. Typically, the remote host cannot be reached because of an intervening firewall, or if an intermediate router is down.

  • PortUnreachableException Signals that an ICMP Port Unreachable message has been received on a connected datagram.

SocketException itself: Thrown to indicate that there is an error in the underlying protocol, such as a TCP error.

Therefore I would say yes, there is no way to continue, since TCP already tried to ensure to recover from tranmission problems.

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Hmm, I see. Thanks for explaining that, it really helps –  TheLQ Apr 13 '12 at 1:30

I wouldn't say that SocketExceptions are fatal but the whole connection should be considered bad. While I completely agree with the previous answer by stacker it is important to note that SocketException is a child of Exception and not Error. I would consider children of Error to be fatal while Exceptions can have recoverable states. Unfortunately, in this case the recoverable state would be to open a new connection.

Depending on your business logic, it might be useful to create a class that extends IOError (IOError extends Error) and catch and re-throw as an IOError rather than as an Exception if it required that losing the socket causes the application to enter an unrecoverable state and cannot be handled reasonably.

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