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Of course I know this have to do with endianess. I know Java is big-endian while C# is little-endian.

I have a working program in Java which sends a string to an external system. The thing is that they require to use a 2 byte header at the beggining of the string that represents its length.

In this 2 byte header, the first one is just to tell if the string exceeds 255 characters, if not, it is always 0. But the second byte (which is the one that i can't get right in C#) will represent the length of the string, if the first byte is 0 (in almost all cases) it represents the whole lenth of the string, let's say 226.

So in java, I have this segment of code that calculates the header and append the original string so we can have the final string to send, and it works just fine:

Java working segment of code:

String iso_str = iso_buf.toString();    // This contains original string without header

int iso_len = iso_str.length();     // We need to know if it exceeds 255

int i, j;
i = (int)(iso_len / 256);           // Always 0. It would be 1 if original string bigger than 255
j = (int)(iso_len % 256);           // Length of the string (most times 226)

Integer ii = new Integer(i);
Integer jj = new Integer(j);

byte[] bmsg_0200 = new byte[iso_len + 2];   // We create an array of bytes making room for the 2 bytes header and the original string
bmsg_0200[0] = ii.byteValue();      // Header byte number one
bmsg_0200[1] = jj.byteValue();      // Header byte number two

System.arraycopy(iso_str.getBytes(), 0, bmsg_0200, 2, iso_str.length()); // Then we just copy the original string in the array after the header         

String mensaje_str = new String(bmsg_0200); // Make the whole byte array into one string to send

In the part that says: bmsg_0200[1] = jj.byteValue(); is where java actually gets a byte value that works (and I think it puts -30 there when jj is 226). And the final system understands this header, therefore reads all the message.

I tried to replicate the code in .NET (C#) and I have the following code:

C# not working segment of code:

int tramaISOLongitud = iso.Length;  // iso contains original string without header, We need to know if it exceeds 255

int i, j;
i = (int)(tramaISOLongitud / 256);  // Always 0. It would be 1 if original string bigger than 255
j = (int)(tramaISOLongitud % 256);  // Length of the string (most times 226)            

byte[] tramaISOBytes = new byte[tramaISOLongitud + 2];  // We create an array of bytes making room for the 2 bytes header and the original string
tramaISOBytes[0] = Convert.ToByte(i);   // Header byte number one
tramaISOBytes[1] = Convert.ToByte(j);   // Header byte number two

System.Text.ASCIIEncoding encoding = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding();
System.Array.ConstrainedCopy(encoding.GetBytes(iso), 0, tramaISOBytes, 2, tramaISOLongitud); // Then we just copy the original string in the array after the header

System.Text.ASCIIEncoding enc = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding(); 
string tramaISOHeader = enc.GetString(tramaISOBytes); // Make the whole byte array into one string to send

The last code compiles and everything, but gets the wrong byte in tramaISOBytes[1] = Convert.ToByte(j); because is little-endian. So i tried using System.Net.IPAddress.HostToNetworkOrder as follows:

int tramaISOLongitud = iso.Length;  // iso contains original string without header, We need to know if it exceeds 255

int i, j;
i = (int)(tramaISOLongitud / 256);  // Always 0. It would be 1 if original string bigger than 255
j = (int)(tramaISOLongitud % 256);  // Length of the string (most times 226)    

int i2 = System.Net.IPAddress.HostToNetworkOrder(i);
int j2 = System.Net.IPAddress.HostToNetworkOrder(j);    

byte[] tramaISOBytes = new byte[tramaISOLongitud + 2];  // We create an array of bytes making room for the 2 bytes header and the original string
tramaISOBytes[0] = Convert.ToByte(i2);  // Header byte number one
tramaISOBytes[1] = Convert.ToByte(j2);  // Header byte number two

System.Text.ASCIIEncoding encoding = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding();
System.Array.ConstrainedCopy(encoding.GetBytes(iso), 0, tramaISOBytes, 2, tramaISOLongitud); // Then we just copy the original string in the array after the header

System.Text.ASCIIEncoding enc = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding(); 
string tramaISOHeader = enc.GetString(tramaISOBytes); // Make the whole byte array into one string to send

But then j2 gets a huge number (like -503316480) that cannot be converted into a single byte because is too large and for sure i need it in one byte because the header as I said, is just 2 byte long. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance.


OK I will put this on a much simpler way:

In C#:

int test    = -10471344;
int test2   = -503316480;
int test3 = 57856;
byte b = (byte)test;
byte b2 = (byte)test2;
byte b3 = (byte)test3;

If we run these lines we get: b = 80 b2 = 0 b3 = 0

So, why the number -10471344 casted to a (byte) gives 80; and the other ones just give 0? Actually I'm interested in the variable test2 = -503316480 I would like it to be converted in something else, and i get 0. Why b can be 80 and the other ones cannot be something different than 0?


SOLUTION: As Jim said, my problem didn't have anything to do with endianness (although I thought it was everything related to that), but the key knowledge is that in .NET world converting a String into a byte array is no problem, but getting back from byte array to string is where you have problems because you have to use encoding (ASCIIEncoding or UTF8Enconding) and that's where problems arise because your bytes get mangled.

In java I didn't have this kind of problem.

So this is the block of code that did the job:

static byte[] addHeader2(string iso)
{
    int tramaISOLongitud = iso.Length;

    byte highByte = (byte)(tramaISOLongitud >> 8);
    byte lowByte = (byte)(tramaISOLongitud & 255);

    byte[] tramaISOBytes = new byte[tramaISOLongitud + 2];
    tramaISOBytes[0] = highByte;
    tramaISOBytes[1] = lowByte;

    System.Text.UTF8Encoding encoding = new System.Text.UTF8Encoding();
    System.Array.ConstrainedCopy(encoding.GetBytes(iso), 0, tramaISOBytes, 2, tramaISOLongitud);

    return tramaISOBytes;
}

And I just send that byte array through the socket as it is.

THANKS TO ALL FOR YOUR HELP!

share|improve this question
    
Can you confirm that the first byte is 1 if the string is 256-511 chars, 2 if 512-767 etc –  StuartLC Apr 12 '12 at 15:33
    
Java isn't exactly either endianness, per se, I think, though the output stream implementations might be... –  Louis Wasserman Apr 12 '12 at 15:36
    
If original string is 226 characters: Header byte 1 is 0 Header byte 2 is 226 If original string is 260 characters: Header byte 1 is 1 (because it exceeds 255) Header byte 2 is 5 (the difference of the original and 255) And ok I might be misunderstood but can you point me out in my c# code what can i do to put a 226 integer value in one byte big endian like java –  Renexandro Apr 12 '12 at 15:45
    
@Louis Wasserman Could you elaborate on why is not big endian? The bytes in a primitive int in Java are stored in big endian. –  Mister Smith Apr 12 '12 at 16:17
1  
@Renexandro, casting to byte is basically equivalent to taking the least significant 8 bits of the value, or anding with 0xFF. The difference is that -503316480 is a multiple of 256, so its least significant 8 bits are all 0s. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 12 '12 at 16:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem has nothing to do with endian-ness. When you're doing arithmetic, it doesn't matter whether the system is big-endian or little-indian. That is, given this:

int len = 260;

byte highByte = (byte)(len >> 8);
byte lowByte = (byte)(len & 255);

Console.WriteLine("highByte = {0:X2}", highByte);
Console.WriteLine("lowByte = {0:X2}", lowByte);

highByte will always be 1, and lowByte will always be 4.

There's no need to do the HostToNetWorkOrder conversion.

Now, if you're working with negative values, your division and mod operators are going to give you unexpected results. But you said that it's a 2-byte length value that you're storing in an int, so negative values shouldn't give you a problem.

I think if you single-step your original C# code, you'll see that the correct values are stored in the first two positions of the tramaISOBytes array. I suspect the problem occurs when you try to convert the resulting byte array to a string. You're using the ASCIIEncoding to convert your array of bytes to a string, which is going to mangle any byte that's larger than 127 (0x7Fh).

So, rather than your conversion being:

System.Text.ASCIIEncoding enc = new System.Text.ASCIIEncoding();
string tramaISOHeader = enc.GetString(tramaISOBytes);

You want to use an 8-bit encoding. Something like ISO-8859-2, perhaps. Basically, you want something that won't try to do any conversion. Or, better yet, if you're putting this together for transmission, you shouldn't even convert back to a string. Just transmit the byte array directly. That way there's no chance of things getting mangled.

share|improve this answer
    
For the encoding part, do you thing System.Text.UTF8Encoding could work? However I will try to send just the byte array, but I think at the end i need to use encoding for the method: System.Array.ConstrainedCopy(encoding.GetBytes(iso), 0, tramaISOBytes, 2, tramaISOLongitud); or is there any other way to get the bytes of a string without enconding? –  Renexandro Apr 12 '12 at 18:44
    
System.Text.UTF8Encoding would not be a good choice. If the length is > 127, then you run the risk of the conversion treating the two header bytes as a single character. You want an 8-bit encoding that doesn't do any conversions. Or, preferably, don't convert the byte array back to a string. Converting the string to bytes is no problem. Converting it back to a string when you have non-string data in it (i.e. the two header bytes) is a potential problem. –  Jim Mischel Apr 12 '12 at 20:27
    
OK, that makes sense, I just have to wait until the remote system is available for testing, but basically i arranged things to send the byte array through the socket as it is to avoid the potential problem you're talking about. I'll let you know what happens... thanks a lot –  Renexandro Apr 12 '12 at 21:42
    
Yup, it worked! Thank you very much for your help i will vote up whenever i can and I will mark this as the real deal answear. ;) –  Renexandro Apr 12 '12 at 22:09

Copy the 2 bytes into a byte array and give this a try for converting the bytes to ushort:

bool remoteSystemIsLittleEndian = false;
byte[] stringLengthBytes = new byte[] { 1, 255 };

if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian != remoteSystemIsLittleEndian)
{
    Array.Reverse(stringLengthBytes);
}

int stringLength = (int)BitConverter.ToUInt16(stringLengthBytes, 0);

And this for converting the number back to a 2 byte array:

bool remoteSystemIsLittleEndian = false;
int stringLength = 511;

byte[] stringLengthBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes((ushort)stringLength);

if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian != remoteSystemIsLittleEndian)
{
    Array.Reverse(stringLengthBytes);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I just tried your solution and it pretty much result in the same place I am right now with a header byte that needs 4 bytes to be represented when I got only one byte spot available –  Renexandro Apr 12 '12 at 16:13
    
If you got 4 bytes you weren't using ushort as the argument to GetBytes. If you feed it anything but a short or ushort it will produce a byte array of the appropriate length for that type -- unless you first cast to short or ushort. –  JamieSee Apr 12 '12 at 22:11
    
Revised answer to demonstrate with int. –  JamieSee Apr 12 '12 at 22:20

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