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I have a database table Item and access it with linq-to-sql.

I can define a custom Method IsSpecial() for Items which returns true if the square root of Item.id is even:

partial class Item
{
    public static Expression<Func<Item, bool>> IsSpecial = (i => Math.Sqrt(i.Id)%2==0);
}

Then I can use that property in a linq-to-sql query like this:

 datacontext.Item.Where(Item.IsSpecial)

Now for aesthetic reasons, I want to make IsSpecial nonstatic and modify it so I can call it like this:

 datacontext.Item.Where(i => i.IsSpecial())

Ideally this would also allow combining of statements, which the above (working) snytax does not allow:

 datacontext.Item.Where(i => i.IsSpecial() && i.Id >100)

What is the correct syntax for defining this method?

This does not work:

partial class Item
{
    public Expression<Func<bool>> IsSpecial = ( () => Math.Sqrt(this.Id)%2==0 );
    // 'this' keyword not available in current context
}

edit: I am beginning to suspect that I am asking for something that the syntax simply does not allow

I guess I can live with datacontext.Item.Where(Item.IsSpecial).Where(i => i>100)

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BTW datacontext.Item.Where(i => Item.IsSpecial(i)) wont compile. –  leppie Apr 12 '12 at 16:35
    
Why are you defining an IsSpecial property of type Func instead of defining an IsSpecial method? Or even just an IsSpecial property of type bool? –  Ann L. Apr 12 '12 at 16:36
    
datacontext.Item.Where(Item.IsSpecial) will compile however. –  leppie Apr 12 '12 at 16:37
    
@leppie: thanks, I messed up there; I have fixed the syntax –  HugoRune Apr 12 '12 at 16:44
1  
@Ann L.: because local methods cannot be used in a linq-to-sql query. The statement is not executed in C#, it is translated to SQL. –  HugoRune Apr 12 '12 at 16:46
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
partial class Item
{
    public static Expression<Func<Item, bool>> IsSpecial = (i => Math.Sqrt(i.Id)%2==0);
}

Suggestion: add the readonly keyword.

Then I can use that property in a linq-to-sql query like this:

datacontext.Item.Where(Item.IsSpecial)

Right, because Where accepts a parameter of type Expression<Func<Item, bool>>, which Item.IsSpecial is.

Now for aesthetic reasons, I want to make IsSpecial nonstatic and modify it so I can call it like this:

datacontext.Item.Where(i => i.IsSpecial())

The reason this doesn't work is because IsSpecial isn't a function, it's an expression tree. () can only be applied to functions. An expression tree describes a function, but isn't one. You can create a real function using expression.Compile():

datacontext.Item.Where(i => (IsSpecial.Compile()) (i))

However, this won't work, because again, Where is passed an expression tree, and IsSpecial.Compile() isn't actually called. LINQ to SQL tries to convert it to SQL, fails because it doesn't recognise Expression.Compile, and throws an exception.

However, if you could replace (IsSpecial.Compile()) before LINQ to SQL were to see it...

That's where LINQKit comes in:

It provides just that bit of expression tree manipulation to get it working.

datacontext.Item.AsExpandable().Where(i => (IsSpecial.Compile()) (i))

The .AsExpandable() creates a wrapper around datacontext.Item to pre-filter the expression.

Ideally this would also allow combining of statements, which the above (working) snytax does not allow:

datacontext.Item.Where(i => i.IsSpecial() && i.Id >100)

No problem:

datacontext.Item.AsExpandable().Where(i => (IsSpecial.Compile()) (i) && i.Id > 100)
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this looks very promising, will check it out, thanks! I am a bit sceptical about including another library just for this, but the link to linqkit also led me to tomasp.net/blog/linq-expand.aspx which seems to discuss this problem in greater detail –  HugoRune Apr 12 '12 at 21:11
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You can use IsSpecial directly:

partial class Item
{
     public static Expression<Func<Item, bool>> IsSpecial = (i => Math.Sqrt(i.Id)%2==0);
}

datacontext.Item.Where(Item.IsSpecial)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 First solution that in fact will compile. I did however make a comment about the same thing at the time :) –  leppie Apr 12 '12 at 16:39
    
Sorry, I messed up when copying the syntax in my initial question, this is what I meant to write. Ideally I would want to change this to something like (NOT VALID:) datacontext.Item.Where(i=>i.isSpecial() && i.Id>100 && [more properties], however I am beginning to suspect that what I am asking is impossible –  HugoRune Apr 12 '12 at 16:53
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Try putting the assignment to IsSpecial in a constructor and have all the other constructors delegate to it, or you could use a partial method such as OnCreated to assign the expression to IsSpecial. Inside of partial class Item

partial void OnCreated()
{
     IsSpecial = () => Math.Sqrt(this.Id)%2==0;
}

Doing this will always assign IsSpecial, and allow access to "this".

share|improve this answer
    
this works insofar as I can use this in an expression this way. However Linq will insist on passing a parameter into the expression used inside a .Where clause, so ()=>xyz should not work, it needs to be (item)=>xyz, which means i have to ignore a passed parameter, and the whole thing gets messy. However this suggestion helped me quite a bit in solving a related problem, so thanks! –  HugoRune Apr 12 '12 at 21:26
    
@HugoRune Looking at some of your previous comments, I think (I actually have no idea) that this would work as per one of the comments as you stated you wanted: datacontext.Item.Where(i=>i.IsSpecial() && i.Id>100 && [more properties] –  JKor Apr 13 '12 at 2:11
    
yeah, i thought so too, but it turns out that this is not possible in this way. Leaving aside the 'this' issue, this will still not work even if I use a constant instead of 'this'. Reason:IsSpecial is an Expression tree, not a simple function or lambda. Calling IsSpecial() is not valid syntax. I=>i.IsSpecial && i.Id>100 is not valid syntax either, you cannot concatenate expression trees like this. The confusing thing is that if I use a simple delegate or function instead of an Expression<func>>, it will compile and work with normal Linq, but linq-to-sql is a different beast –  HugoRune Apr 13 '12 at 7:10
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