Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to count the number of each prime factor of an integer. For an example 18=2^1*3^2. I want to get all exponent part of each prime number. For number 18, it is 1+2=3.
Below is the program which generates all the prime factors of an integer.

    Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
    int n = sc.nextInt();
    for (int i = 2; i <= n / i; i++) {
        while (n % i == 0) {
            System.out.print(i + ", ");
            n /= i;
        }
    }
    if (n > 1)
        System.out.print(n + ", ");

For input 18, this program prints 2, 3, 3, . As for completing my requirement, to count the occurrence of each prime factor, i can first add them all to a list, then a for loop from starting to ending of the list can count the occurrence of each number. But this idea doesn't seem good to me. Unnecessary i am adding one for loop, for all prime factors, which just tells me that this prime factor comes n times in the list.
Any better approach to get the number of individual number of prime factors of an integer.

share|improve this question
3  
4  
Just count how many times your inner loop is executed. –  n.m. Apr 12 '12 at 15:59
    
i * i <= n is slightly faster than i <= n / i –  Peter Lawrey Apr 12 '12 at 16:07
    
@n.m. Nope. I don't want to count the total number of factors. I want to count that for all prime factors of an integer, how many times every prime factor is occurring . For example integer 18 can be written as 2^1*3^2. I want to count all the occurance of all factors. As in the prime factor of integer 18, 2 comes 1 time and 3 comes 2 times. So my final ans is 2, 3. What you are saying will print the number of prime factors, which is 3 in this example. –  Ravi Joshi Apr 12 '12 at 16:08
1  
@Ravi: the two conditions are equivalent (i*i<=n if and only if i<=n/i), provided nothing overflows. What Peter is saying is that the compiler+JIT isn't smart enough to figure that out and do the faster calculation regardless of which you write. –  Steve Jessop Apr 12 '12 at 17:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

yy, just as @attila and @robert said:

import java.util.Scanner; 
import java.util.TreeMap; 

public class Test{
    public static void main( String args[] ){
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        int n = sc.nextInt();
        TreeMap<Integer, Integer> factors = new TreeMap<Integer, Integer>(); 

        for (int i = 2; i <= n / i; i++) {
            int count = 0; 

            while (n % i == 0) {
                System.out.print(i + ", ");
                n /= i;
                count ++; 
            }
            if( count > 0 ) 
                factors.put( i, count ); 
        }
        if (n > 1){
            System.out.print(n + ", ");
            factors.put( n, 1 ); 
        }
        System.out.println(); 

        System.out.println( "-------------" ); 
        for( Integer factor : factors.keySet() ){
            System.out.println( factor + "^" + factors.get( factor ) ); 
        }
    }
}

i'm using a treemap because it keeps the factors in their natural order, which is neat :) you could also use a hashmap which should be a bit faster. but the implementation of the prime decomposition should be so slow that i don't think it matters much :)

share|improve this answer
    
I apologize for not asking the question correctly. Let say i have an integer 18. 18=2^1*3^2 i want the exponent number for each prime factor. here exponent factors are 1 and 2. –  Ravi Joshi Apr 12 '12 at 16:18
    
updated my answer accordingly ... –  kritzikratzi Apr 12 '12 at 16:50
    
Thank you so much. Works fine. Initially i was thinking to make use of any java collection but i thought that mathematically if there exists any other solution, then i should implement that. Because at the end i just want prime_num_1^any_integer*prime_num_2^any_integer*prime_num_3^any_integer..... –  Ravi Joshi Apr 12 '12 at 17:01
1  
you don't need no treemap here. First, since you test is in increasing order, you can only get factors in increasing order. Second, if all you do is print, why not print them out each inside the inner loop, under if (count > 0) ... (and one more possible printout in the end, if n>1)? The only need for TreeMap is if you'd want to return it. –  Will Ness Apr 13 '12 at 11:28
    
"The only need for TreeMap is if you'd want to return it." yes, that's exactly why i put it there :) –  kritzikratzi Apr 13 '12 at 17:44

Every time you are executing n/=i;, you are encountering a factor. So by incrementing a counter (Starting from 0) at that point, you get the total number of factors at the end of the factorization process.

Note that you need an extra if for properly handling prime numbers. For primes you do not find any factors, so the counter will be 0 -- you need to set it to 1 after the loop in this case (one factor: itself)

share|improve this answer
    
Nope. I don't want to count the total number of factors. I want to count that for all prime factors of an integer, how many times every prime factor is occurring . For example integer 18 can be written as 2^1*3^2. I want to count all the occurance of all factors. As in the prime factor of integer 18, 2 comes 1 time and 3 comes 2 times. So my final ans is 2, 3. What you are saying will print the number of prime factors, which is 3 in this example. –  Ravi Joshi Apr 12 '12 at 16:04
    
So, for your example with 18, you want to see the 1 and the 2, not the total, 3, correct? –  David Conrad Apr 12 '12 at 16:05
    
@DavidConrad yeah... absolutely correct. –  Ravi Joshi Apr 12 '12 at 16:15
    
@DavidConrad 18=2^1*3^2 i want the exponent number for each prime factor. here exponent factors are 1 and 2. –  Ravi Joshi Apr 12 '12 at 16:16
    
Maybe you should re-word your question. This part lead me believe you were after the total factor count: I want to count the exponent part of each prime number. For number 18, it is 1+2=3. –  Attila Apr 12 '12 at 16:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.