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SELECT 
    CH.ChannelName, COUNT(O.OrderID) AS Orders
FROM
    Channels CH
LEFT JOIN Programs P USING (ChannelID)
LEFT JOIN Codes C USING (ProgramID)
LEFT JOIN Order O USING (CodeID)
WHERE
    O.OrderDate = '2012-04-11'
GROUP BY 
    CH.ChannelName
WITH ROLLUP

This query is only returning channels that have orders. How do I display ALL channels, even if there are no orders in the order table for that particular channel? So basically, all channels will be listed, and if there are no orders for that channel, I need to display zero.

I know the solution to this is probably very simple. Thanks for the help.

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3 Answers 3

SELECT 
    CH.ChannelName, COUNT(O.OrderID) AS Orders
FROM
    Channels CH
LEFT JOIN Programs P USING (ChannelID)
LEFT JOIN Codes C USING (ProgramID)
LEFT OUTER JOIN Order O USING (CodeID)
WHERE
    O.OrderDate = '2012-04-11'
GROUP BY 
    CH.ChannelName
WITH ROLLUP
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Outer join won't help in that case. It'll only add rows for orders that have no corresponding channel, but that's not what OP wants. –  KL-7 Apr 12 '12 at 16:15

Try this:

SELECT CH.ChannelName, SUM(O.OrderDate = '2012-04-11') AS Orders
FROM Channels CH
LEFT JOIN Programs P USING (ChannelID)
LEFT JOIN Codes C USING (ProgramID)
LEFT JOIN Order O USING (CodeID)
GROUP BY CH.ChannelName
WITH ROLLUP
share|improve this answer
1  
Suppose you have a channel that has only one order on some other date, let's say on 2012-12-12. After the join there'll be only one row for that channel and it'll have 2012-12-12 in the OrderDate column. Then your where-clause will filter this row out and the resulting table won't contain that channel at all. Am I right? –  KL-7 Apr 12 '12 at 16:18
    
@KL-7 You are absolutely right. I edited my answer. –  Mosty Mostacho Apr 12 '12 at 16:25
    
Nice, that should work. But if you think of performance I'd expect moving this condition into the join statement make it a bit faster as we get a smaller set of rows after joining the tables. –  KL-7 Apr 12 '12 at 16:29
    
@KL-7 Actually, we don't get a smaller set of rows as it is a left join. –  Mosty Mostacho Apr 12 '12 at 16:33
    
Hm, don't we? With O.OrderDate = '2012-04-11' in the join statement we filter out a whole bunch of rows from order table leaving only those that we're going to count and removing all all orders for other dates. What left join does is just adding one nullified row for channels that don't have any orders at all (or any orders on that date if you add this condition into the join statement). –  KL-7 Apr 12 '12 at 16:36

Your where-clause limits the query to the channels that have orders for that date, but if you move that condition into the join statement it will give you the result you want:

SELECT 
    CH.ChannelName, COUNT(O.ID) AS Orders
FROM
    Channels CH
LEFT JOIN Programs P USING (ChannelID)
LEFT JOIN Codes C USING (ProgramID)
LEFT JOIN Order O ON CH.CodeID = O.CodeID AND O.OrderDate = '2012-04-11'
GROUP BY 
    CH.ChannelName
WITH ROLLUP

Note, that it should be COUNT(O.ID) to make SQL count only rows with non-null orders. In that case you'll correctly get zero orders count for channels without orders.

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