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Sorry if this seems like a silly question but I have a lot of "form" classes all of which extend Form. I have an abstract class called FormService and specific form services that extend this class. What I want to do is have an abstract method called populate() which takes a type of form thus calling the correct service for the given type through inheritance.

So I have something like:

public abstract FormService {
    public abstract void populate(Form form);
}

public TestFormService extends FormService {
    public void populate(TestForm form) {
      //populate
    }

Where TestForm is a type that extends Form. Is this possible because I can't seem to get the affect I want.

Thanks in advance,

Alexei Blue.

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could use generics:

public abstract FormService<F extends Form> {
    public abstract void populate(F form);
}

public TestFormService extends FormService<TestForm> {
    @Override
    public void populate(TestForm form) {
      //populate
    }
}

Note that the use of @Override here is just good practice, but unrelated to the question.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for @Override mention – Tim Pote Apr 12 '12 at 16:19
    
Thanks for that Paul :) +1 – Alexei Blue Apr 12 '12 at 16:20

Yes this is possible. As while overriding a method in the the child class, can always use subclass of the super class declared as an argument in the parent class method. In this example as testForm is a subclass of Form class this will work. Thumb rule is while overriding we can always restrict the hierarchy but not widen the hierarchy.

Suppose parent class of Form class is Document. In TestFormService class populate method we can not use Document as an argument. This will violate overriding rules.

share|improve this answer
1  
You shouldn't describe overloading, then OP asks about overriding. So, please post an example of what you mean, so it is clearer what you mean. – Tom Jan 30 at 11:11
    
I tried adding code example. But is giving some kind formatting error. – user3395036 Jan 31 at 15:16
    
stackoverflow.com/help/formatting – Tom Jan 31 at 17:04
    
Is there an example comming? – Tom Feb 1 at 20:45

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