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How to enforce move semantics when a vector grows?

insert, push_back and emplace(_back) can cause a reallocation of a std::vector. I was baffled to see that the following code copies the elements instead of moving them while reallocating the container.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct foo {
    int value;

    explicit foo(int value) : value(value) {
        std::cout << "foo(" << value << ")\n";
    }

    foo(foo const& other) noexcept : value(other.value) {
        std::cout << "foo(foo(" << value << "))\n";
    }

    foo(foo&& other) noexcept : value(std::move(other.value)) {
        other.value = -1;
        std::cout << "foo(move(foo(" << value << "))\n";
    }

    ~foo() {
        if (value != -1)
            std::cout << "~foo(" << value << ")\n";
    }
};

int main() {
    std::vector<foo> foos;
    foos.emplace_back(1);
    foos.emplace_back(2);
}

On my specific machine using my specific compiler (GCC 4.7) this prints the following:

foo(1)
foo(2)
foo(foo(1))
~foo(1)
~foo(1)
~foo(2)

However, when deleting the copy constructor (foo(foo const&) = delete;), the following (expected) output is generated:

foo(1)
foo(2)
foo(move(foo(1))
~foo(1)
~foo(2)

Why is that? Would’t moving generally be more efficient, or at least not much less efficient, than copying?

It bears noting that GCC 4.5.1 does the expected thing – is this a regression in GCC 4.7 or is it some deviously clever optimisation because the compiler sees that my object is cheap to copy (but how?!)?

Also note that I made sure that this is caused by reallocation, by experimentally putting a foos.reserve(2); in front of the insertions; this causes neither copy nor move to be executed.

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marked as duplicate by Ben Voigt, Matthieu M., FredOverflow, BЈовић, bmargulies Apr 13 '12 at 0:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
It's not a regression, it's a bug fix. The standard specifies that std::vector will only prefer an element move constructor which is non-throwing. –  Ben Voigt Apr 12 '12 at 16:23
2  
@KonradRudolph: I don't think this is an issue. As far as I understood duplicates are kept and simply become pointers to the base question. Am I wrong ? –  Matthieu M. Apr 12 '12 at 16:27
1  
@KonradRudolph: That answer doesn't say to use noexcept, it says to use throw(). Did you try that? –  Ben Voigt Apr 12 '12 at 16:28
1  
@BenVoigt no, throw() doesn't help either. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 12 '12 at 16:39
1  
It is possible to dispatch on no-throw thanks to the noexcept operator (not to be confused with noexcept specifications) and type traits. std::move_if_noexcept comes in handy though. –  Luc Danton Apr 12 '12 at 16:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The short answer is that I think @BenVoigt is basically correct.

In the description of reserve (§23.3.6.3/2), it says:

If an exception is thrown other than by the move constructor of a non-CopyInsertable type, there are no effects.

[And the description of resize in §23.3.6.3/12 requires the same.]

This means that if T is CopyInsertable, you get strong exception safety. To assure that, it can only use move construction if it deduces (by unspecified means) that move construction will never throw. There's no guarantee that either throw() or noexcept will be necessary or sufficient for that though. If T is CopyInsertable, it can simply choose to always use copy construction. Basically, what's happening is that the standard requires copy construction-like semantics; the compiler can only use move construction under the as-if rule, and it's free to define when or if it'll exercise that option.

If T is not CopyInsertable, reallocation will use move construction, but exception safety depends on whether T's move constructor can throw. If it doesn't throw, you get strong exception safety, but if it throws, you don't (I think you probably get the basic guarantee, but maybe not even that and definitely no more).

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Two years later, I’m now convinced that this interpretation is wrong – it may conform to the letter of the standard but almost certainly not to the intent: noexcept is widely interpreted by users of C++ (including standardese experts) to be a binding nothrow specification, contrary to what you’ve said. In fact, library implementors widely use it as such, and while the GCC implementation used in my question might be strictly conforming, it performs sub-optimally. This is supported by the fact that subsequent versions of GCC fixed this behaviour. –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 4 at 8:33

It's not a regression, it's a bug fix. The standard specifies that std::vector will only prefer an element move constructor which is non-throwing.

See also this explanation and this bug report.

This question is also relevant.

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Sorry but this is wrong, see updated question. noexcept changes nothing. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 12 '12 at 16:28
    
@KonradRudolph: Click the bug report link. –  Ben Voigt Apr 12 '12 at 16:35
1  
@KonradRudolph If noexcept changes nothing, the proper answer is not to say this answer is wrong, but to attempt static_assert( std::is_nothrow_move_constructible<foo>::value, "" );. –  Luc Danton Apr 12 '12 at 17:05
    
@Ben The bug report (and one of the answers on the other question) make explicit reference to noexcept, which is why I was confused. Furthermore, using noexcept would be more logical, no? And just to confuse things further, throw() also doesn’t work on my machine. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 12 '12 at 17:40
1  
@Luc Alas, no dice. The metafunction evaluates to false. Surely this is a bug, no? –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 12 '12 at 17:48

Tip-of-trunk clang + libc++ gets:

foo(1)
foo(2)
foo(move(foo(1))
~foo(2)
~foo(1)

If you remove the noexcept from the move constructor, then you get the copy solution:

foo(1)
foo(2)
foo(foo(1))
~foo(1)
~foo(2)
~foo(1)
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