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I have the following asm code (x86).

.input:
mov ah, 00h         ; get key from keyboard buffer
int 16h         ; interrupt 16h 
mov dl, al      ; move ASCII code into dl
mov ah, 02h     ; function 02
int 21h         ; interrupt 21h
mov ah, 0Eh     ; tell the BIOS to print the character in the AL register
mov al, dl      ; copy dl into al
int 10h         ; print al
sub al,0Dh      ; check if it's carriage return
jz 01h          ; jump relative 1 (to skip newLine)
call newLine        ; add CR LF
jmp .input      ; loop

However, the jump if zero instruction is not working as expected (hoped) i.e. jz 01h.

I would like to jump relative 1 instruction (or add one to the IP), to jump over the call newLine subroutine.

Currently when I press the enter key and the jz instruction is called, I believe the program is jumping absolute as a piece of code early on in the program is run.

Any ideas?

Thanks, Steve

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If you're using x86 an absolute call is usually 5-bytes long so try jz 05h instead. –  Jason Larke Apr 13 '12 at 6:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Jump 01h will not actually skip past the call, because it counts bytes, not instructions. The call instruction consists of multiple bytes. Why not add another label after the call that you can jump to, like jz .afterCall?

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Thanks Rob, it surprises me that I can't just add one to the instruction pointer by calling a relative jz instruction. Your suggestion of adding a new label does of course work, but I was hoping for a way to call jz with a relative operand –  Steve Apr 12 '12 at 16:57
1  
@Steve you can, but as Rob said, 1 is not the correct offset. You'd jump to the offset bytes of the call and try to execute them as code, which they are not. Bad Things will surely happen. –  harold Apr 12 '12 at 17:14
    
Don't confuse the "Instruction Pointer" with being an "Instruction Counter". It does NOT reflect the instruction count! –  Brian Knoblauch Apr 12 '12 at 18:26
    
@Steve: Your call is 3 bytes long (1 for the op-code and two bytes for the offset), so a jz 3 will surely works... –  Aacini Apr 12 '12 at 20:28

What about

jz _no_newLine      ; jump 
call newLine        ; add CR LF
_no_newLine:
jmp .input          ; loop
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