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I'm in a discussion at work as to how to properly handle containers as parameters.

We have a function that takes in a container parameter, and wants to return the container filled ONLY with what the function puts into it:

class bar;

void foo(std::vector<bar> &bars) 
{
   //do stuff that fills bars.
   //exceptions may be thrown.
   //we may also legally return early 
   return;
}

On one side of the discussion, we have people that say we should bars.clear() first and then run the function.

For example:

void foo(std::vector<bar> &bars) 
{
   bars.clear();
   //do stuff that fills bars.
   //exceptions may be thrown.
   //we may also legally return early 
   return;
}

My own preference is to try to reach the strong exception guarantee as closely as I can, which means making a local container, filling that and swapping before returning, but otherwise leaving bars untouched.

For example:

void foo(std::vector<bar> &bars) 
{
   std::vector<bar> localBars;
   //do stuff that fills localBars.
   //exceptions may be thrown.
   //we may also legally return early 
   if (returnEarly)
   {
       bars.swap(localBars);
       return;
   }
   //do more stuff that may change localBars

   bars.swap(localBars);
   return;
}

The first example is the 'classic' method; of clearing your parameters before doing anything and going from there.

The second method, to me, sets up a strong exception guarantee (assuming nothing else the function does can change internal states), and avoids a clear() call.

Are there any advantages or disadvantages to picking one method over the other one?

Note that for this function, a strong exception guarantee isn't required; if the function fails nothing in the parameters or anything else it does will matter by the time it gets up to the exception handler.

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closed as not constructive by Robᵩ, talnicolas, Jarrod Roberson, Matthieu M., ildjarn Apr 12 '12 at 19:07

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
stackoverflow.com/faq : If your motivation for asking the question is “I would like to participate in a discussion about ______”, then you should not be asking here. –  Robᵩ Apr 12 '12 at 17:06
    
I'm in a discussion about ..., what are the pros and cons for either side seems like a perfectly valid question to me –  Grizzly Apr 12 '12 at 17:08
1  
Why not return the result? Then the function can have no side-effects, which is the strongest possible exception guarantee. –  Mike Seymour Apr 12 '12 at 17:09
    
I asked this mainly because I had doubts as to what might be the proper way to go. Having recently read Exceptional C++ and it's exception safety guarantees, I'm a recent convert to trying to reach the stronger guarantees, but I can go overboard when I jump on the bandwagon. I was looking for feedback into the details that may not be as obvious for going one way or another. (As for returning the vector, while the best solution to my example, it's not really feasible for the problem at this time; I agree it is the proper proper solution). –  Taeolas Apr 12 '12 at 17:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The two are really different.

Advantages of clear:

  • reuse memory
  • no out-dated information left in bars

Advantages of swap:

  • strong exception guarantee

The question cannot be answered in general, what semantics/guarantees do you seek in your case ?

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Probably the best solution/summary I'm going to get, and better than the "we've always done it this way" type of response/feeling I was getting locally which lead me to ask this here in the first place. Specifically in my cases, it will depend on the functions involved. I wanted to get a better idea of the advantages of each method, and make sure there wasn't an elephant lurking in either solution that I wasn't seeing. Thank you everyone who responded (or who will respond). –  Taeolas Apr 12 '12 at 17:58

You've mentionned one advantage of using swap: it provides a strong exception guarantee. Whether this is really important is another question: if the argument passed by the client will be immediately destructed when the exception propagates (almost always the case in the code I've seen), it really doesn't matter.

There is another important difference: clear() doesn't free memory or reduce the capacity. If the client code calls your function in a loop, with the vector defined outside of the loop, the vector will quickly attain its maximum size, and you will not have any reallocations when filling it. With the swap strategy, of course, you always reallocate. And if you're not concerned with this sort of performance issue, you should be returning the vector, not taking a non-const reference to it as a parameter.

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swap() is better with respect to exceptions. clear may have an advantage if the container is huge and you have memory constraints. a more functional/cleaner style can be:

std::vector<bar> void foo()
{
    std::vector<bar> bars;
    ...
    return bars;
}

RVO will take care of it most of the time and with c++11 and move constructors/assignment it will just be efficient.

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Ideally I'd love to return bars, but the examples I'm dealing with at the moment can not handle that refactoring at this time. In the future, it would be the route I would prefer to go in. –  Taeolas Apr 12 '12 at 17:13
1  
I almost mentioned the possibility of a return value myself. The usual reason for using the interface he has is performance, and the one of the key performance issues is that if you constantly reuse the same vector in the calls, it soon attains sufficient capacity so that no new allocations are necessary. There's no way to achieve this using return values. –  James Kanze Apr 12 '12 at 17:17
    
@James, I totally agree with you regarding performance. But one should be careful when doing premature optimizations. I have seen too much "penny wise, pound foolish" optimizations that were done at terrible compromise with long term maintainability of the project. "It Depends" –  dpiskyulev Apr 12 '12 at 17:40
    
@dpiskyulev Totally agreed. Use the return value initially, and only if the profiler shows that you need to, try one of the others. In practice, I suspect that this will be fairly rare. –  James Kanze Apr 12 '12 at 17:50

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