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How do you deal with analysis and design phases when you plan to develop a system using a functional programming language like Haskell?

My background is in imperative/object-oriented programming languages, and therefore, I am used to use case analysis and the use of UML to document the design of program. But the thing is that UML is inherently related to the object-oriented way of doing software.

And I am intrigued about what would be the best way to develop documentation and define software designs for a system that is going to be developed using functional programming.

  • Would you still use use case analysis or perhaps structured analysis and design instead?
  • How do software architects define the high-level design of the system so that developers follow it?
  • What do you show to you clients or to new developers when you are supposed to present a design of the solution?
  • How do you document a picture of the whole thing without having first to write it all?
  • Is there anything comparable to UML in the functional world?
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closed as not constructive by sclv, ehird, Gene T, Jeremiah Willcock, Graviton Apr 13 '12 at 4:23

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possible duplicate of Is there a software-engineering methodology for functional programming? –  sclv Apr 12 '12 at 18:37
    
Just touching on one thing you mentioned, haddock is the recommended documentation form. Wise creation of modules, functions, and packages usually makes haddock sufficient to document code sufficiently (plus cabal package descriptions). –  Dan Burton Apr 12 '12 at 23:12
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2 Answers

I'm no professional but I'll try my hand at answering some of these questions.

Would you still use use case analysis [?]

I don't see why not. Gather use cases, and design a module API that you wish to expose that satisfies the use cases. Determine whether the use cases call for a typeclass, or for just plain functions.

or perhaps structured analysis and design instead?

I'm unfamiliar with that approach, but from what I gather from the wiki article, it looks like it would work just fine.

How do software architects define the high-level design of the system so that developers follow it?

I would assume that they specify a module and the types that each part of the module should have. Again, I am not a professional, so I'm not really sure what is done in practice.

What do you show to you clients or to new developers when you are supposed to present a design of the solution?

You show the clients something that will make sense to them. If your client is savvy enough, just show them the type signatures and explain the important functions. If they are less savvy, then draw pretty pictures, or whatever you have to do. OOP makes comparisons with real world objects, while FP makes comparisons with...well...functions. The typical way to illustrate a function to newbies is to portray it as a machine where you put certain things in, and then other things come out.

How do you document a picture of the whole thing without having first to write it all?

A "picture"? Just defining the type signature for the important functions, and then leave the implementation as undefined. There's a package out there somewhere that gives you better stubs that will remind you at compile time which parts you still need to implement.

Is there anything comparable to UML in the functional world?

Um...no?

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Let's examine this claim:

UML is inherently related to the object-oriented way of doing software.

First of all, this is not really true. You can still model interactions, use-cases, states, and data models in UML whatever the implementation is to be.

Second of all, Haskell's type classes are a form of object-orientation: they provide polymorphic dispatch on the type of their arguments (which allows different function implementations that use the data that exist in that type).

So, yes, if you really want to keep using UML, go ahead.

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Haskell's type classes are not a form of object-orientation. They are a form of ad-hoc polymorphism, which you typically also get from object systems. But they do not couple data and methods, which is the hallmark of object-orientation. –  sclv Apr 12 '12 at 18:07
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that couples the type of the data and methods! haskell.org/haskellwiki/OOP_vs_type_classes –  sclv Apr 12 '12 at 18:11
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@sclv is right; Haskell typeclasses are much closer to OOP interfaces than OOP classes, but even that analogy isn't perfect. In fact, the closest thing to OOP classes in Haskell are simply data types containing functions and monadic actions. –  ehird Apr 12 '12 at 18:16
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@sclv I dont think this is true (although it is an acceptable "lie to children"). If you dont think about the constraint system, typeclasses are just a slightly restricted object system. In that typeclasses have 1. subtyping 2. implicit self reference 3. replaceable self reference (aka inheritance). A typeclass is just a (parameterized) abstract class in oop while an instance is just an object that inherits from that abstract class. With GHC 7.4 and some trickery involving newtype, unsafeCoerce and implicit parameters this correspondence becomes complete. –  Philip JF Apr 14 '12 at 2:45
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I also think that "couple data and methods" is really independent from OO. Consider Go as the example of a language where methods are separate from structs, yet it is very OOP. –  Philip JF Apr 14 '12 at 2:52
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