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In my MVC3 application I have the model ( not important properties deleted ):

public class AccountViewModel
{
    [StringLength(65)]
    public string Property1 { get; set; }

    [StringLength(65)]
    public string Property2 { get; set; }
}

The problem is when an action is submited validation attribute called twice, and I can get 4 errors in summary, instead of 2:

'Property1' length must be less than 65 characters
'Property1' length must be less than 65 characters
'Property2' length must be less than 65 characters
'Property2' length must be less than 65 characters

I dont use Validate method in my controller's code. The problem appears also with my custom attributes, but its not happens with Required attribute. Also I have to note that ctor of the custom attributes also called twice

My action

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult CreateOrEdit(AccountViewModel model) {

    if (!ModelState.IsValid) {
        return View("Edit", model);
    }

    try {
        _accountService.InsertOrUpdate(model);

    }
    catch (Exception ee) {
        ModelState.AddModelError("", ee.Message);
        return View("Edit", model);
    }

    return RedirectToAction("Index");
}

On View I render my errors using:

@{
    var errors = ViewData.ModelState.Errors();
    <div class="alert alert-block alert-error @(errors.Count == 0 ? "hide" : "")" > 
    <h4 class="alert-heading"> You got an error!</h4> 
    <ul>
        @foreach (var error in errors) {
            <li>@error</li>
        }
    </ul>
    </div>
}

And I double re-check once more that ViewData.ModelState already contains errors twice.

share|improve this question
    
Hmmm you have 55 in attribute declaration and 65 value in error message –  Michal Franc Apr 12 '12 at 18:36
    
can you post the action? also, confirm that you are not calling ValidationSummary twice in your view. –  Steve Mallory Apr 12 '12 at 18:37
    
updated with action code @Steve Mallory –  bogert Apr 12 '12 at 18:40
    
Yes, Im not using ValidationSummary method at all @Steve Mallory –  bogert Apr 12 '12 at 18:41
    
@bogert then I don't understand where you are seeing the messages –  Steve Mallory Apr 12 '12 at 18:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem was in integrating Ninject. If you use Ninject.MVC package ( I use version 3 ) it registers his own ModelValidationProvider while initializing and removes the old one:

In Ninject.Web.Mvc.MvcModule

this.Kernel.Bind<ModelValidatorProvider>().To<NinjectDataAnnotationsModelValidatorProvider>();

In Ninject.Web.Mvc.NinjectMvcHttpApplicationPlugin:

public void Start()
{
    ModelValidatorProviders.Providers.Remove(ModelValidatorProviders.Providers.OfType<DataAnnotationsModelValidatorProvider>().Single());
    DependencyResolver.SetResolver(this.CreateDependencyResolver());
    RemoveDefaultAttributeFilterProvider();
}

So, rather than creating my own implementation of IDependencyResolver ( Ninject Kernel wrapper ) I followed this tutorial or you should remove Ninject.MVC package and remove its binaries from the bin folder.

share|improve this answer
    
The Ninject extension does not cause that problem if used correctly. Althouth w/o knowing how you set up ninject it is impossible to give you an answer. –  Remo Gloor Apr 13 '12 at 23:14
    
You right, I used It incorrectly, now when it is installed correctly - everything is fine @RemoGloor –  bogert Apr 16 '12 at 10:28
    
@bogert, what does "when it is installed correctly" mean ? could you please explain? –  Salfab Jul 1 '14 at 12:13

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