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I am trying to make some existing values to missing values (not deleting them). Here is the basic structure of my data set.

I want to treat AGE and GENDER as missing whenever A is less than B. For example, when A=1 and B=3, I want to treat values of AGE and GENDER on the last two rows as missing (as shown on the data sets).

In my data both A and B go from 1 to 4 and have every combination of them.

Asterisks mean I have more data between them. Thanks in advance!

BEFORE
    ID A B AGE GENDER
    --------------
    1  1 1 35  M
    *  * * *   *
    *  * * *   *
    5  1 2 23  F
    5  1 2 21  M
    6  1 2 42  F
    6  1 2 43  M
    *  * * *   *
    *  * * *   *
    20 1 3 43  F
    20 1 3 39  M
    20 1 3 23  M
    21 1 3 32  F
    21 1 3 39  M
    21 1 3 23  F
    *  * * *   *
    *  * * *   *
    55 2 4 32  M
    55 2 4 12  M
    55 2 4 31  F
    55 2 4 43  M
    *  * * *   *
    *  * * *   *

AFTER    
     ID A B AGE GENDER
     --------------
     1  1 1 35  M
     *  * * *   *
     *  * * *   *
     5  1 2 23  F
     5  1 2 .   .
     6  1 2 42  F
     6  1 2 .   .
     *  * * *   *
     *  * * *   *
     20 1 3 43  F
     20 1 3 .   .
     20 1 3 .   .
     21 1 3 32  F
     21 1 3 .   .
     21 1 3 .   .
     *  * * *   *
     *  * * *   *
     55 2 4 32  M
     55 2 4 12  M
     55 2 4 .   .
     55 2 4 .   . 
     *  * * *   *
     *  * * *   *
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I added a variable called ID as well as a few more values to distinguish how observations are groups by variable B. –  Ken Apr 13 '12 at 16:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

How about now?

data temp;
  retain idcount 0;
  set olddata;

  ** Create an observation counter for each id **;   
  prev_id = lag(id);

  if id ^= prev_id then idcount = 0;
  idcount = idcount + 1;

run;


** Sort the obs by ID in reverse order **; 
proc sort data=temp; 
    by id descending idcount;
run;

data temp2;
    retain misscount 0;
    set temp;
    by id descending idcount;

    ** Keep the previous age and gender **;
    old_age = age;
    old_gender = gender;

    ** Count the number that should be missing **;
    if a < b then nummiss = b - a;
    else nummiss = 0;

    ** Set a counter of obs that we will set to missing **;   
    if first.id then misscount = 0;

    ** Set the appropriate number of rows to missing and update the counter **;
    if misscount < nummiss then do;
       misscount = misscount + 1;
       call missing(age, gender);
    end;
run;

proc sort data=temp2 out=temp3(drop=misscount nummiss idcount prev_id);
by id idcount;
run;
share|improve this answer
2  
I think there is a cross-row aspect to the solution the OP requires, not just a comparison of data within the row. There will need to be some by-group logic with RETAIN to achieve the output in the "after" data. I would test some code and post a solution but I'm on iPhone on a train :) –  sasfrog Apr 12 '12 at 22:30
    
@sasfrog Thanks for pointing out retaining values in the after data. –  Ken Apr 13 '12 at 15:58
    
@user1294223 The code did not output what I wanted, by the way. Plus, creating new variables for AGE and GENDER would be wise, for the sake of record keeping. –  Ken Apr 13 '12 at 16:07
1  
What exactly are you looking for? My code does this: "I want to treat AGE and GENDER as missing whenever A is less than B....on the last two rows..." According to this, why would ID 5 and 6 have only 1 missing row - is it because it only has a total of two columns? Should your statement be something like "I want to treat AGE and GENDER as missing whenever A is less than B....on the last two rows as missing if there are more than 2 rows, the last row missing if there are exactly two rows, and nothing missing if there is exactly one row." –  user1294223 Apr 13 '12 at 16:26
    
For each group (ID), I want to treat AGE and GENDER as missing whenever A is less than B but the number of missing rows should be equal to the difference between B and A. For example, ID = 5, B-A=1 so that's why it has only 1 missing row and ID = 55 have two missing rows because B-A=2. There are 6 possible ways when A < B -- (1,2) (1,3) (1,4) (2,3) (3,4) (2,4). I hope this explains what I exactly want. –  Ken Apr 13 '12 at 18:32

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