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I'm trying to merge two data frames on a unique id and year. In SQL language I'm trying to do a left outer join, so in merge that is all.x=TRUE. Some elements of the y dataframe dont have all of the values (unique id,year combinations) in the x DF. In the case of a missing match I want to merge the row from the y data frame that has the same unique id as in the x data frame, but using the first year that I have prior to the missing one. Any suggestions on how to approach this merge? Thanks a lot!

Edit Wanted to make it more concrete

Dataframe x:

Id  year    var1 
1   2010    100
1   2011    105
1   2012    110
2   2010    100 
2   2011    105
2   2012    106

Dataframe y:

Id  year    var2    var3
1   2010    5       7
1   2011    10      8
2   2010    9       6

Desired merge:

Id  year    var1    var2    var3
1   2010    100     5       7
1   2011    105     10      8
1   2012    110     10      8
2   2010    100     9       6
2   2011    105     9       6
2   2012    106     9       6
share|improve this question
    
I would suggest you post a reproducible code. You could do this by using head(x dataframe, 10) and head(y dataframe, 10) and the lines of code you are attempting to use. that is much more helpful in diagnosing your problem and providing accurate and efficient solutions. – Tyler Rinker Apr 12 '12 at 19:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd do this in two steps:

> out <- merge(x, y, all.x=T)
> out
  Id year var1 var2 var3
1  1 2010  100    5    7
2  1 2011  105   10    8
3  1 2012  110   NA   NA
4  2 2010  100    9    6
5  2 2011  105   NA   NA
6  2 2012  106   NA   NA

Then use na.locf from the zoo package:

library(zoo)

> apply(out, 2, na.locf)
     Id year var1 var2 var3
[1,]  1 2010  100    5    7
[2,]  1 2011  105   10    8
[3,]  1 2012  110   10    8
[4,]  2 2010  100    9    6
[5,]  2 2011  105    9    6
[6,]  2 2012  106    9    6

and this can be coerced to a data.frame easily enough.

> as.data.frame(apply(out, 2, na.locf))
  Id year var1 var2 var3
1  1 2010  100    5    7
2  1 2011  105   10    8
3  1 2012  110   10    8
4  2 2010  100    9    6
5  2 2011  105    9    6
6  2 2012  106    9    6
share|improve this answer
    
Wow that's quite nice, thanks. Do I need to be concerned about the order of the dataframe out? It doesn't seem like na.locf is taking any of the structure into account with regards to Ids and years, but just going up the dataframe to the previous values. – Rob Richmond Apr 12 '12 at 20:04
    
Yes, na.locf just copies the previous values without regard to your Id or year. Also, if y contained a year which wasn't previously matched (but would be the appropriate candidate for an entry in x), this wouldn't catch it. – Brian Diggs Apr 12 '12 at 20:09
    
when you call merge on data.frames there is a default argument of sort=TRUE which will sort by the merged column (In your case you're relying on the intersection of the names for that). If you want it sorted in a different way, you can do that before the na.locf step using order: out[order(out$var1),] or whatever. But you're correct, na.locf is only working on the vector that you send and has no knowledge of the rest of the data.frame. – Justin Apr 12 '12 at 20:11
    
@BrianDiggs good point! This isn't a robust answer at all, just one that answers the specific question. You could do a merge(..., all=T) and then start picking things apart if you were concerned about extra rows in y. You might also want to only call na.locf on the columns you expect to have NA in rather than on all the columns. – Justin Apr 12 '12 at 20:13
    
Thanks again for all of the help and comments. Glad I decided to post this here! – Rob Richmond Apr 12 '12 at 20:24

This doesn't use merge, but loops through the rows of x one at a time to find the appropriate match in y. Probably not efficient, but it works.

do.call(rbind,
  lapply(seq(length=nrow(x)), function(r) {
    yid <- y[y$Id==x$Id[r],]
    yeardiff <- x$year[r] - yid$year
    yeardiff[yeardiff < 0] <- NA
    cbind(x[r,], yid[which.min(yeardiff),])
}))

The result is

  Id year var1 Id year var2 var3
1  1 2010  100  1 2010    5    7
2  1 2011  105  1 2011   10    8
3  1 2012  110  1 2011   10    8
4  2 2010  100  2 2010    9    6
5  2 2011  105  2 2010    9    6
6  2 2012  106  2 2010    9    6
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this example as well. Its nice to have both just in case I want to do something slightly different. – Rob Richmond Apr 12 '12 at 20:17

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